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6, 2000 April, 2000

Highlights—February 27, 2016

  • Business Insider:

    IBM added 70,000 people to its ranks in 2015, and lost that many, too. By Julie Bort. Excerpts: IBM CEO Ginni Rometty wants you to know that IBM is hiring. And not just anybody, Rometty told attendees of IBM's annual investors day on Thursday.

    IBM is very particular in hiring for the hot new skills where IBM is expanding like machine learning, big data, mobile, and security.

    "When you look at the number of applicants, we're more selective than MIT," she joked.

    All told, IBM added 70,000 IBMers to its payroll in 2015, she said, albeit many of them came in through acquisitions.

    IBM has spent more on acquisitions in the last 12 months than it has at any other 12-month period in its history, she said. IBM bought 14 companies in 2015, and she's already bought three more in 2016.

    What she didn't mention is that IBM is still also cutting. ...

    IBM's global headcount ended 2015 at 377,757 full time employees, vs. 379,592 in 2014 (down less than 1%). Headcount grew a little over 1% in IBM's less-than-wholly owned subsidiaries to 9,577 people. And it's contract work force stayed virtually the same, at 24,464 people. ...

    GBS hired 30,000 people in the last two years, Schroeter said. As its headcount stayed fairly stable, that means it also lost 30,000 workers, again, some through attrition, some by selling off a big business unit, some by shifting to more contract workers. IBM also moved 6% of its consultants offshore in the past two years. It's hard to know what that total number is but IBM said it has about 120,000+ employees in GBS.

    IBM is always very careful when talking about its global headcount, which has been going through major shifts for years.

    It won't say many people it lays off each year, or how old they are or in what areas they work. It only talks only about "resource actions" or "workforce rebalancing" in terms of the total amount of money it spends on them. It spent $587 million on such things in 2015 (and nearly $1.5 billion in 2014), it said.

    And CFO Martin Schroeter says that such shifts (including hiring people, retraining existing employees, and laying them off), isn't over yet. "We've been shifting resources aggressively," Schroeter said at the investor meeting. "and we'd like to shift them more aggressively."

    What holds IBM back, particularly in the consulting unit, is that some of these people are on long-term contracts serving customers, he said.

    Selected comments from the "Watching IBM" Facebook page follow:

    • "Workforce rebalancing?" Give me a break.
      • They all learned that BS at the foot of the master, Lou Gerstner.
    • Run away as fast as you can
    • This woman is full of crap
    • I was told yesterday that IBM had 40,000 unfilled positions they just could not find people for.
      • Not at the salary they are willing to pay; minimum wage doesn't cut it even in BRIC Countries.
    • Fired 70,000 in US, hire 70,000 overseas?
    • Amazing how the corporate elite reward themselves, even as the ship continues to sink. Do they not have a conscience?
    • Spoken like a politician, not a manager. Does not take Watson to find the truth.
    • Ginni is an expert at double-talking. Fortunately, real IBMers know when an IBM exec is lying. Their lips move.
  • The Register

    (United Kingdom): IBM UK puts 1,352 Global Tech Services heads 'at risk'. Punters demanding better prices and services, 'we need to throw costs overboard'. By Kat Hall. Excerpts: IBM is to cut 185 jobs in its Global Technology Services division in the UK – the latest swing of its corporate axe over the last 24 months.

    The company started the 45-day redundancy notice period with GTS staff on 15 February after forming a Employee Consultation Committee earlier this month, as we revealed.

    According to the latest internal memo seen by The Register, Big Blue is actually putting 1,352 staff in Blighty at risk. In the document, IBM stated GTS "continues to drive an aggressive agenda to transform its operational model to maintain our competitive advantage. ...

    One of our sources previously said IBM has undertaken "strategic 'resource actions'" every six months for the past year-and-a half, with the latest cuts being the fourth round of redundancies in 24 months. ...

    A spokeswoman at IBM, said the company "continually remixes skills - our clients expect no less as they look to IBM to help them take advantage of innovations and new technologies. IBM continues to hire aggressively in key skills areas."

    Selected reader comments follow:

    • £14k for 20 years service? Ouch, that's a bit of slap in the face.
    • Re: £14k for 20 years service? Better than state side, one month severance regardless of your tenure. IBM just changed their severance terms...which probably means they are in the process of some large layoffs and the cost of paying the thousands of employees severance based on tenure would be too costly. "Too costly" meaning they could easily afford it, but don't feel like it.
    • Re: £14k for 20 years service? They are offering the statutory minimum only. That's a first. Even for involuntary it's always been above the statutory minimum.
    • It's not just GTS, every unit on the UK is getting shot of people. And it's compulsory, there is no voluntary package.
    • Glad I got out when I did. There's two courses of action if you're at IBM:
      • Get out
      • Make sure your job title has Cloud, Mobile, Analytics or the other one in it.

      IBM is intent on destroying its business and reputation. The so-called growth areas are being tackled purely by buying other companies, and IBM's had such a great record with those, hasn't it?

  • Boulder Daily Camera:

    Concentrix closing IBM campus site in Boulder County; 270 jobs lost. By Jerd Smith and Shay Castle. Excerpts: Concentrix, a Fremont, Calif.-based international customer care and call center company, is closing its facility on the IBM campus in Boulder County and will eliminate 270 jobs in the process. ...

    Concentrix is a wholly owned subsidiary of Synnex Corp. According to Synnex's financial statements, Concentrix had a strong year in 2015. ...

    In September of 2013, IBM announced that Synnex was acquiring IBM's global customer care business in a deal expected to help Synnex and Concentrix grow dramatically, according to corporate statements at the time the deal was announced.

    The initiative was to have resulted in a multi-year agreement in which Concentrix would become an IBM strategic business partner for global customer care

    A Concentrix spokesman said the Boulder facility served other clients and was not tied to IBM.

    News of the closure comes as Colorado's economy continues to grow, with Boulder County enjoying one of the lowest unemployment rates - at about 2.5 percent - in the state and country.

    Selected reader comments follow:

    • I'd like to know how many IBM "regular" employees actually remain at this site now. 300? And with that, I can't fathom that continuing to own and operate it can be anything but a substantial money-loser for Big Blue.
    • As somebody who is here at the IBM facility every day, I can tell you that the place is mostly deserted. Whole buildings have been converted over to server farms with just a handful of contractors (i.e. non-IBMers) to ride herd on them. Probably half the food vendor stalls in the cafeteria are empty -- you can go into the cafeteria at high noon on any day and find maybe 50 people having lunch down there. Why on earth IBM continues to own and operate this place is beyond me.
    • They stay there because it *is* a good place for a server farm. They have spent hundreds of million$ (no exaggeration) over the decades to install multiple power substations, diesel generators, massive cooling, telecom, security, etc. Some customers can't or won't allow the servers to be offshored, so IBM needs at least some US server capacity. Much cheaper to use the existing Boulder site than to move it to somewhere else. Property taxes and utility costs kill them in California, New York, and even Texas, compared to Colorado. However, if Boulder goes forward with the muni and jacks the power rates, the equation might very well change.
    • We just need to use our imaginations. There are over 2 million square feet under roof, most of a square mile of property with a nice fence on the perimeter. Just add some concertina wire to the top and the possibilities are almost endless.
  • Financial Times:

    IBM— recutting the pie — FT. A new reporting structure can help only so much. Excerpts: There are no declining businesses, as anyone who reads company earnings reports can tell you. There are just growing businesses trapped inside shrinking ones. In 2015, IBM’s sales fell 1 per cent, sustaining a limp pattern of some years’ standing. But sales from “strategic imperative” units grew 26 per cent, to a third of the total.

    There is, however, a danger that product categorisation becomes a game. Most businesses of sufficient complexity can be sliced up such that some slice or other is getting bigger. Paranoid investors (the kind that stay in business) will always suspect that the categories are a bit specious. This suspicion is encouraged by IBM’s description of its “imperative” units, which sounds like an industrial accident at a jargon factory: cloud platforms, cognitive solutions, internet of things, analytics, mobile, social. That IBM is a frenetic acquirer and divestor makes the growth still harder to parse. ...

    The market prices IBM as a slow decliner. The stock trades under 10 times earnings and has fallen 40 per cent in two years. This, surely, has something to do with why, at Thursday’s investor day, IBM revealed changes to its reporting structure. So might the fact that more detailed segment reporting had a tonic effect on the shares of both Google and Amazon. ...

    Two things make a Google/Amazon pop unlikely. The new distinctions at those companies were very clear: advertising is not self-driving cars, and computing is not online retail. Understanding the new IBM still takes work. And those other two companies were growing overall, which always makes scepticism easier to overcome.

  • Wall Street Journal:

    IBM Keeps Watson Financials Under Wraps. New reporting structure sheds light on company’s transition into cloud computing, data analytics. By Robert McMillian. Excerpts: International Business Machines Corp. on Thursday changed its financial reporting structure to give investors more insight into the company’s ongoing transition from a traditional supplier of business hardware, software and services into a leader in cloud computing and data analytics

    The changes shed light on some of IBM’s so-called strategic initiatives, but they did little to illuminate its biggest bet: the effort to generate revenue from its “Jeopardy”-winning Watson artificial intelligence technology.

    There “was no ’AWS moment,’” wrote Sanford Bernstein analyst Toni Sacconaghi in a Friday report, referring to Amazon.com Inc.’s decision last year, to report revenue from its Amazon Web Services cloud computing unit after nine years in business. Those figures propelled Amazon shares upward as the company outlined a business that was more profitable and faster-growing than many had expected. ...

    Meanwhile the Watson unit has been a major beneficiary of a massive, ongoing reallocation of labor at IBM. The company’s workforce shrank in the last three years, but IBM also has hired voraciously to build up Watson and other capabilities. Last year it added 70,000 new employees (while simultaneously losing 72,000 through layoffs and attrition). More than 20,000 jobs remain unfilled. ...

    The Watson division now has about 5,000 employees, including thousands brought in through IBM’s purchases of the Weather Co., Truven Health Analytics Inc., Merge Healthcare Inc. and other acquisitions.

    But revenues for the unit appear to be small. The Watson unit is part of a broad segment called Cognitive Solutions that also includes other types of data analytics and transaction-processing software. However, Watson drives revenue in other reporting segments such as Global Business Services. Cognitive Solutions revenue totaled $17.8 billion for 2015, up just 3% year over year.

    However, the Watson division itself doesn’t appear to be bringing in significant amounts of revenue to date, at least not by IBM’s standards. Mr. Sacconaghi estimates that stand-alone Watson revenues accounted for less than $200 million in 2015.

    Selected reader comments follow:

    • Watson is old-school kitchen sink AI, and IBM has a culture that is hardened against radical change, plus a plethora of competitors who have the agility and insight into making money from AI algorithms, massive data, data centers and structured databases. In fact, I can think of so many competitors and advantages of those competitors in data analytics and cloud computing (read: data center services), from consumer to enterprise (C2C, B2C, B2B). IBM thinks it can buy data to win share, but that isn’t guaranteed. Data will just migrate elsewhere – it is fluid, despite what many think, and proprietary structuring of data is only so useful.
    • Should IBM be given the same deference as Amazon? The CEO is definitely not Bezos, and we had much more insight into what Bezos was doing with his money while building out AWS and distribution – and now we see the results. I don’t have anywhere near the same confidence in IBM. It comes back to culture. They will hire and fire people until they think they’ve got somewhere, including hiring relatives of the CEO and firing engineers, but in the end it is genetic culture.
  • Computerworld:

    Ahead of Senate's H-1B hearing, a look at the early warnings. In 1995, then-Labor Secretary Robert Reich feared the H-1B program could inflict real harm; here’s what he says now. By Patrick Thibodeau. Excerpts: The H-1B program has an "unknowably large potential," Reich told a Senate committee some 20 years ago, to inflict "real competitive harm on skilled U.S workers."

    Reich's efforts changed nothing. Three years after he testified, in 1998, Congress raised the H-1B cap.

    The Senate Immigration Subcommittee is holding a hearing Thursday to consider the impact of the H-1B visa program on high-skilled workers. A Disney IT worker who lost his job last year, Leo Perrero, will tell his story to the committee.

    Reich won't be testifying, but if he were to do so, this is what he would tell lawmakers:

    "I'd say the program has become just another way for Big Tech to keep wages down," Reich said in an email response to a question from Computerworld. "It was originally conceived as a means of getting into the U.S. specific skills in very short supply, which Americans didn't have or for which they couldn't be readily trained," said Reich. "That's not what it has morphed into."

    The anger is particularly seen in the candidacies of Donald Trump, the billionaire developer who is leading the race for the GOP presidential nomination, and from Sen. Bernie Sanders, the Vermont independent who is seeking the Democratic nomination. Both want the H-1B visa program reformed.

    "Who could be more different, who could be more opposite," said Kilcrease of Trump and Sanders. But together they probably "represent all the unhappiness with our economy."

  • Wall Street Journal:

    Share Buybacks: The Bill Is Coming Due. U.S. companies borrowed heavily in recent years, but often bought back stock rather than investing in their business. By Justin Lahart. Excerpts: U.S. companies went on a borrowing binge in recent years. Nonfinancial corporations owed $8 trillion in debt in last year’s third quarter, according to the Federal Reserve, up from $6.6 trillion three years earlier. As a share of gross value added—a proxy for companies’ combined output—corporate debt is approaching levels hit in the financial crisis’s aftermath.

    Most of the debt increase came from bond issuance, as nonfinancial companies took advantage of the lowest rates on corporate bonds since the mid-1960s. That is a plus as companies in many cases extended the maturity of their debt and lowered borrowing costs.

    The negative: Rather than investing the funds they raised back into their businesses, companies in many cases bought back stock instead. That was something that many investors welcomed, but it may have come with future costs that they didn’t fully appreciate. ...

    Because those stock buybacks helped reduce companies’ total shares outstanding, earnings per share got a boost. Indeed, absent the past three years’ share-count reductions, S&P 500 earnings per share would have been 2% lower in the fourth quarter than what companies are reporting, according to S&P Dow Jones Indices.

  • Watching IBM FaceBook Page. Selected posts follow:
    • Former GTS worker let go in 2015 is looking for others in the Austin area for purpose of filing for Trade Adjustment Act benefits. Contact me at watchingIBM@Gmail.com.
    • Sent from the UK: "IBM UK GTS IS Have told us in ECC communications that we are to have 185 job cuts from approx 1340 staff. We are been given no offer of a voluntary separation, so we are government guidelines amount.

      Half a week’s pay for each full year you were under 22 one week’s pay for each full year you were 22 or older, but under 41 one and half week’s pay for each full year you were 41 or older.

      Length of service is capped at 20 years and weekly pay is capped at £475. The maximum amount of statutory redundancy pay is £14,250.

      We also have to work our 3 months service too, so our approximate leave date would be Aug 5th; can you imagine having to work for about one month not knowing; then when you do know you have to stay another five because of what your contract states. Then get 1/3 to 1/5 or less the normal package. Everyone is a bit peed. Not sure about other areas yet, but i reckon it will soon follow.

    • If anyone is aware of terminations connected with revenue recognition violations. Please contact mdbutera@gmail.com. There is potential interest in a story being run on questionable termination practices connected with the IBM SEC investigation.
  • Glassdoor IBM reviews. Selected reviews follow:
    • "Contractors don't get raises"

      Former Employee — Anonymous Employee in Mount Kisco, NY. I worked at IBM (more than 8 years). Pros: Prestigious company with innovative solutions...great to be able to say you work at IBM. All really depends on department, manager, colleagues, etc. A lot of smart and talented employees both full-time and contractors.

      Cons: Company is made up of over 50% contractors. (Could be as high as 80% according to WSJ article.) Layoffs of both contractors (despite renewed contracts for years) and full-time employees are abrupt and often handled very poorly. People are viewed as a number. As a contractor, don't expect a rate increase no matter how long you are there. Not even a cost-of-living increase. A lot depends on managers. The department is only as good as the manager...the morale is only as good as the manager. Your work can be inspiring, satisfying, and growth oriented depending on the manager.

    • "Client Solution Executive"

      Current Employee — Anonymous Employee. Pros: Good firm with high ethics. Cons: None I could see as of now.
    • "Project Manager"

      Current Employee — Project Manager in New York, NY. I have been working at IBM full-time (more than 10 years). Pros: Coworkers are supportive, fun yet professional and dedicated to client success. True teamwork. Work from home flexibility. Challenging work and projects. Cons: Job cuts, offshoring, insignificant to no pay raises, lack of promotion opportunities and management by bean-counters have decimated formerly highly effective teams and negatively impacted customer and employee satisfaction.
    • "Life at IBM in Baton Rouge"

      Current Employee — Louisiana in Baton Rouge, LA. I have been working at IBM full-time (more than a year).

      Pros: The people at the Baton Rouge Center are great people to work with. Friendly and gives you help on your project even if they are on another.

      Cons: This is a consultant position, not a developer position. If you are looking for in-house developer position this is not it. It is also a sink or die situation. There is no way to move vertical or horizontal. You are stuck in your position until you find another job. You work 44 hours or more per week which means you will burn out quickly on some project.

      Advice to Management: Office Managers: We know you all are working hard to give us good projects, but the project managers are still putting us in positions that we did not signed up for. We are developers not on call help desk 24/7/365.

    • "Consulting group within IBM"

      Former Employee — Anonymous Employee. I worked at IBM full-time (more than 8 years). Pros: Large company with many opportunities. Cons: Very limited salary increases in years! Layoffs only made more work for those still employed with no salary increases. Advice to Management: Reward the little guy, not just executive management. Listen to your employees.
    • "Software Sales"

      Former Employee — Software Sales in Chicago, IL.

      Pros:

      • If good relationship with manager, you will be protected from negative ratings even if you do not make your quota.
      • Labs and briefing centers excellent to work with on opportunities.

      Cons:

      • Capping of earnings.
      • Females not paid as well as males for same roles.
      • Pay below that of other comparable firms.
      • Finance organization runs all areas of the firm.
      • Health benefits not as good as most other firms in the industry.

      Advice to Management: Too many layers of management with numerous executives not having any employees reporting to them any longer. IBM is known not be top heavy.

    • "Great Company to work"

      Current Employee — Anonymous Employee. Pros: Flexible management, great exposure and learning, good career opportunities. Cons: Salaries are more or less stagnant. HR policies are not transparent.
    • "Systems Administrator"

      Former Employee — Anonymous Employee. Pros: Flexible work at home job, salary and vacation were a plus. Some training provided. Most co-workers were very willing to share knowledge and work together. Cons: Next layoff always looming, employee morale low. Company more interested in bottom line than customer satisfaction; cutting support staff to where it was impossible to meet workloads. Advice to Management: Retain your talented workers; it is the people that make your clients satisfied with IBM products and services. Reduce the top-heavy proportion of management to employees.
    • "You would have to be mad to consider them."

      Current Employee — Senior Software Engineer in Hursley, England (UK). I have been working at IBM full-time (more than 10 years).

      Pros:

      • None.
      • IBM has completely lost direction. The company has forgotten what it was good at.
      • CEO is selling spin and vaporware.
      • Existing customers are paying the price for executive mismanagement.
      • Executives are too busy stuffing their pockets and trying to buy the next Facebook or Google.

      Cons:

      • Employees are not valued and treated as commodities.
      • All employees are just waiting for the next round of enforced layoffs or searching the job ads.

      Advice to Management:

      • Lower and middle management should grow a pair.
      • Upper management and executives should move on.
      • Split the company up and sell it to someone who values the existing customer base. Oh no, you can't do that because you are too busy milking the business to pay for your bonuses and try to pick the next winner.
    • "Mixed bag. Not for the faint of heart."

      Current Employee — Associate Partner in Washington, DC.

      Pros: IBM has some of the best technology in the world and is fully committed to delivering client solutions that change the way we live. Lots of absolutely, terrific, top notch people to work with. Dedication to clients, willingness to persevere in the face of obstacles, some terrific managers and leaders who will absolutely go to the mattresses for what's right and for their people. You have the ability to determine the course of your career.

      Cons: Management practices are abysmal. "Operational rebalancing" when sales and revenue are down means an annual tradition of mass layoffs. Management doesn't seem to understand what that does to employees in a services business. Salaries are acceptable, bonuses in GBS are awful and continue to get worse. IBM will work you as hard as you are willing to work and then expect more. We have a split personality — we are trying to transform the company, but at the same time, we aren't willing to wait for investments to bear fruit.

      Advice to Management: Stop the annual layoffs. It's a sign of ineffective performance management and is poisonous to the staff. Don't force us to go after non-strategic opportunities because of crazy targets. Fix performance measures so we stop cannibalizing the different lines of business. And we have WAAAY too many sellers that are pure overhead!

    • "IBM really struggling"

      Current Employee — Sales Leadership. I have been working at IBM full-time (more than 10 years).

      Pros: Good people and teams. Many strong, well respected products. Large install base across many solution areas. Trying to catch Amazon and Microsoft.

      Cons: Fifteen quarters of decline says it all. The brand has lost significant value as perceived by client decision makers. The demand for IBM has dropped significantly. Outsourcing and reduced staffing has hurt customer satisfaction and support. Turnover is very high including senior leaders. The cloud message isn't working. Boosting cloud revenue through creative tactics. Reduced compensation.

      Advice to Management: Innovate or die. Fifteen quarters tells you which direction you are headed. The transformation requires something far more radical since it isn't working.

    • "Recruiter at IBM Costa Rica"

      Former Employee — Recruiter in San Jose (Costa Rica). I worked at IBM full-time (less than a year). Pros: You don't have to work a lot, if you don't want to. Nobody will notice. Cons: Unprofessional and incompetent managers. Poor infrastructure and equipment. Advice to Management: Change the cons.
    • "Lack of Growth"

      Former Employee — Anonymous Employee.

      Pros: There were lots of internal resources within the company but it was mostly a serve yourself setup. There was very little support in helping you become better at what you do.

      Cons: The big problem I hit while there was an underwhelming direction from leadership on priorities. Building certain types of software requires attention to detail and there was very little paid to things that made certain products usable. All the decisions makers only cared about having a list of check boxes they could mark with no bearing on utility, quality, or impact it had on the overall sustainability of the project.

      Advice to Management: Balancing sales driven priorities with careful quality controls and serious analysis of existing customer problems is a must. Throwing everything to the side just to get new customers is a sign that the company doesn't get their own product in any deep sense, and thus has no business selling it.

    • "Technical Sales Specialist"

      Former Employee — Anonymous Employee. Pros: The name IBM is everywhere. Cons: There is simply too much pressure on employees. Advice to Management: They need to start caring about the IBMers, not just shareholders.
    • "Really smart people, upper management is unrealistic"

      Former Employee — Staff Software Engineer in Research Triangle Park, NC. I worked at IBM full-time (more than 8 years).

      Pros: Extremely smart and competent people. You get to learn a lot. You'll make great friends. Flexible work schedule, enlightened attitude towards work-from-home. If you prove yourself, they will even let you work remotely (from another city) if you have a family emergency to handle, or even to work in another city permanently too.

      Cons: The best projects seem to be hand picked for certain people. It can be very hard to find the sort of work that you want to do (that would develop your career). You may very well end up doing work no one else wants to do (like level 3 support). When you try to put in for a transfer, management gums up the works, and makes it nearly impossible for you to transfer, unless it's one of the positions THEY want you to go to. They also try to make you go to level 2 (phone support), even though you are a software engineer who wants to write code. All of this is meant to make you wanna quit eventually. They have layoffs every year, it can be scary.

      Advice to Management: Need to focus on retention, and respect the individual, which is starting to disappear more and more. Make it easier for people to transfer to where they want to go within the company. We can't stay in the same role for 10 years.

    • "Misguided"

      Current Employee — Senior Software Engineer in Austin, TX. I have been working at IBM full-time (more than 10 years). Pros: Really smart and honestly dedicated people at work. Not one of the so called American companies that are almost entirely staffed by foreign workers. Good mix of all cultures and types. Cons: Management does not know what to do with the company's future. Late to every game. Innovation is limited to buying companies that innovate. Lays off really respected and senior people with impunity. Tries to get the entire company as large and diverse as IBM to follow common policies. Ends up not letting anyone grow to true potential.
    • "Needs to go back to basics"

      Former Employee — Consultant in Canberra (Australia). Pros: Work from home. As long as you deliver, no one cares. Cons: Milk the initial salary negotiation for as much as you can as there are no increases for many years to come. Bad morale due to inefficient management practises. GTS looks to be retired by 2018. Advice to Management: Clean up the top management structure and go back to basics. Corporations do not want to do business with IBM due to the inefficient internal processes and lack of understanding of what builds and maintains customer satisfaction. Your staff are people not 'resources' — treat them as such.
  • Alliance for Retired Americans Friday Alert — February 26, 2016 (PDF). Stories this week include:
    • Ways and Means Committee Chair Kevin Brady Describes How He’d Cut Social Security
    • Poll: Social Security Tops the Agenda for Next President
    • See How Little the Ultra-Rich Pay into Social Security with New Tool
    • Florida Alliance for Retired Americans (FLARA) Hosts Legislative Conference
    • Deadline Extended Until February 29 for Western Regional Conference Registration
If you hire good people and treat them well, they will try to do a good job. They will stimulate one another by their vigor and example. They will set a fast pace for themselves. Then if they are well led and occasionally inspired, if they understand what the company is trying to do and know they will share in its sucess, they will contribute in a major way. The customer will get the superior service he is looking for. The result is profit to customers, employees, and to stcckholders. —Thomas J. Watson, Jr., from A Business and Its Beliefs: The Ideas That Helped Build IBM.

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