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6, 2000 April, 2000

Highlights—November 7, 2015

  • CNBC:

    Divestitures key part of strategy: IBM CEO Rometty. By Ritika Shah. Excerpts: IBM CEO Ginni Rometty said while focusing on size isn't always a good strategy, sometimes it actually can matter. After experiencing falling revenue for 14 straight quarters, the tech giant is downsizing.

    At The New York Times DealBook conference Tuesday, Rometty told CNBC's Andrew Ross Sorkin the decline has been caused in part simply by being a global company. The other major factor is IBM has been divesting, a lot.

    "In my tenure, I've divested $8 billion of businesses," Rometty said. "The point was, they weren't about the future of where we were going." ...

    Rometty told Sorkin that IBM is working its way to that higher value. She said the company's 50 percent gross profit margins are up 80 basis points already.

    "Tech is littered with areas that you could have high growth and make no money in, and that just has never been us," Rometty added. "It's been about the enterprise and what we do, and where we bring value to the client, and where in fact it brings value to shareholders here."

  • LinkedIn:

    The Search for Leadership at the University of Iowa, Part 3. By Peter E. Greulich, President, MBI Concepts Corporation. Excerpts: The Iowa Board of Regents wanted new leadership for the University of Iowa (UI), one of the three institutions they govern. They sought a new president to be their agent of change and chose a former IBM Senior Vice President. He will, most certainly, be an agent of change. But, without understanding IBM’s history, the changes its employees and culture have endured and the role this executive played in those changes, the Board of Regents can’t predict if he will be a positive or negative influence on one of their universities. ...

    Unfortunately, IBM is now a centralized, financially autocratic hierarchy.

    It does its financial thing right: it slows labor costs by manipulating performance appraisals to suppress raises; it reduces labor costs by relocating workloads worldwide; and it eliminates labor costs through on-going, continuous resource actions (layoffs). Through these actions it generates tremendous cash flow. This obscures the fact that it is no longer an effective organization or that it no longer does the right things: customers wait too long on critical product updates, one out of two employees would not recommend it as a place to work, it invests in paper instead of people, processes and products, and during this century one out of every three shareholders has abandoned the stock. It meets few of the expectations of its customers, employees, shareholders or society. These actions are generating ill will.

  • Glassdoor IBM reviews. Selected reviews follow:
    • “Business analytics and big data software sales”

      Former Employee — Software Sales Representative in San Francisco, CA. I worked at IBM full-time (more than 3 years). Pros: Flexible hours, being able to work from home. Great tools available to execute your selling activities. There some great people still around. Cons: Commission and incentives to meet your OTE is a joke. This is an accounting firm that specializes in cutting expense. Benefits are below market. Travel is restricted! Advice to Management: Stay relevant to market. Cloud and SAAS should your primary focus.
    • “IBM Manager”

      Former Employee — People Manager in Bratislava (Slovakia).] I worked at IBM full-time (more than 3 years). Pros: Great career opportunities. Top management really impressive and helpful. Cons: Low pay in outsourcing centres. Very process oriented — no room for creativity anymore — rigid. Advice to Management: A bit more emphasis on customer experience, a bit less emphasis on tight budget.
    • “great place to work at”

      Current Employee — QA Engineer in Kfar Saba (Israel). I have been working at IBM (more than a year). Pros: High Salary, Very nice people. Cons: Didn't find any cons, great place
    • “manager”

      Current Employee — Anonymous Employee. Pros: Best Company to work for. Provides Work Life Balance, Multiple clients and locations. Assets are numerous and can leverage them. Cons: Very much process defined, takes long time to take decisions.
    • “iBM”

      Former Employee — Anonymous Employee. Pros: it is a Great place to work. Cons: There are not any cons. Advice to Management: none.
    • “IBM in a mess”

      Former Employee — Anonymous Employee. Pros: Able to work from home is one of the biggest pros at this company. Cons: IBM for the past several years have just been concentrating on releasing staff on a quarterly basis; no opportunity for growth as well. It has become a very toxic environment to work in. Advice to Management: Need to appreciate the staff a lot more than they have been.
    • “IT Architect”

      Current Employee — IT Architect in Saint Augustine, FL. I have been working at IBM full-time (more than 10 years).

      Pros: The company still has some of the best benefits in the industry. Opportunities still exist and it is what you make of them.

      Cons: Culture has been in decline for the past decade. No improvements in the culture can be seen on the horizon as the company continues to shift jobs to India. Damage has been done in India with layoff's in a country where they are trying to shift jobs too. They cannot hire enough skilled people and those that they do have, leave for better paid jobs.

      Advice to Management: Unfortunately the company is so large as a multinational company, it is having a difficult time realizing what it could be if it where a global company. For instance, its Cloud division is segmented and one part has no idea what the other part is doing. It has no management of a complete end-to-end service in Cloud. So it suffers in implementations. No one is watching the end-to-end and upper management continues to operate as if it were 5 years ago.

      IBM attempts at Agile miss the mark as no one is watching how it fits into the big picture. How can it when it operates as a multinational company instead of a global one?

    • “No Opportunity for Advancement”

      Former Employee — Anonymous Employee. Pros: You get the IBM name on your resume. Cons: Poor opportunity for advancement. Advancement is based on luck of the draw by which contracts you are put on.
    • “Great company in decline”

      Former Employee — Anonymous Employee. I worked at IBM full-time (more than 10 years). Pros: Very smart people. Very dedicated people. Cons: Blind forced march to $20/share by 2015 drove out the talent and brought on a terrible decline. Advice to Management: Value your people.
    • “Think twice”

      Former Employee — Senior Managing Consultant in Washington, DC. Pros: Not so sure about the pros. Competitive salaries and benefits for as long as you can find consulting engagement opportunities. Cons: IBM = I am by myself. Might look like a pun but it is the reality if you are a consultant with IBM GBS (Global Services). Advice to Management: Management is there only to fill the paper work and there is plenty of paper work to be filled. Probably no other company can beat the bureaucratic system at IBM.
    • “Software Development Manager”

      Current Employee — Software Development Manager in Austin, TX. I have been working at IBM full-time (more than 10 years). Pros: The people we work with are fantastic, benefits are some what competitive, interesting work, big name, as everyone knows "IBM". Cons: Performance evaluations with forced bell curve, Middle management seems out of control and not aligned with what the CEO directives; periods of wild hiring/spending followed by layoffs and total budget shutdown. Advice to Management: Communication! Make sure everyone from CEO down to the worker is aligned and knowing the direction everyone is taking. For example, if HR sends a global note with policy change, make sure ALL levels of management are going to follow this. Invest in your employees. Control the budget at all levels.
    • “Great start, terrible finish”

      Former Employee — Senior Consultant in Washington, DC. I worked at IBM full-time (more than 5 years). Pros: No one will pressure you or stress you out about the job you are required to do. They only care about the hours you bill. Cons: Best of luck following the career path you desire or remaining billable. There is little to no work being won in the IT sector and as soon as you hit the bench you have a target on your back. Advice to Management: Remain a very active role in helping someone achieve their career goals. Career development is not solitary and no one should feel alone especially at a company like IBM.
    • “IBM GTS US employees 'persona non grata'”

      Current Employee — Manager in Boulder, CO. Pros: Great people, strong company, respected brand. Cons: Toxic work environment in US, constant skills drain as critical skills are offshored for lower-cost, lower-skilled resources. US employees in GTS have to have an attitude of "not if but when" will I be next. Advice to Management: Refocus on standards with clients and acknowledge, with the client, that only by limiting customization can we drive down costs. Also, develop targeted retraining programs to move highly skilled and experienced infrastructure services resources from the lower value roles to roles in the newer higher value, higher value services like Watson, Cloud, and Mobile.
    • “Senior Transformation Executive”

      Former Employee — Senior Transformation Project Manager in Sylvania, GA. I worked at IBM (more than a year). Pros: Deep knowledge base on tech, best practices in SW dev. Websphere is best front end solution, great support around the world. true professionalism throughout organization. Cons: If you like travel this is a great career. I loved travel and found all new countries offered something in return then just attending to business. Lots of layers, but are necessary. Advice to Management: Keep selling services to all companies around the world, cloud computing becoming the only way to solve IT expenses, true cost of ownership.
    • “Times have changed at IBM”

      Former Employee — IT Service Delivery in Newport, NC. I worked at IBM full-time (more than 10 years).

      Pros: Great co-workers, team environment, and chance for exposure in other areas of IT.

      Cons: When I joined IBM in late 1990's the average tenure was 35 years...now I would say 2 years is a veteran. Also, it appears that the goal is to ship all IT work overseas. Really sad for all the folks who worked so hard and all the customers that supported IBM for so many years. I guess that is what progress has become.

      Advice to Management: The stock market is sending a signal to management and the stockholders... better listen before it is too late.

    • “Great Place to work”

      Former Employee — Anonymous Employee. Pros: Great place to work for women with kids, flexible. Cons: Nothing as such comes to mind, maybe slow promotion.
    • “Not the IBM we used to know”

      Former Employee —Anonymous Employee. I worked at IBM full-time (more than 3 years).

      Pros: Can't really think of any other than we could work from home anytime we wanted (beneficial with school age kids).

      Cons: Where do I start? Portions of my former employer's IT area were outsourced to IBM and we were "encouraged" to apply for the same work there (after hearing that IBM didn't want any of us but were forced to take us by our former employer). We got a 1% increase in our salary and for the 3 years I worked there there was no other salary increase.

      Our portion of the business was managed out of India and other than attempting to bully us (seems the only way they know how to get their point across is to yell) they only cared about SLAs and were you making sure support tickets did not fall out of compliance.

      There was no opportunity for growth and once they could move our work functions to India they did that (we were only guaranteed employment for 2 years).

      Advice to Management: Stop thinking that 3 people working in India can do the same work as one person with vast knowledge of the client working onsite with the client every day.

    • “Good Benefits and Perks”

      Current Employee — Anonymous Employee. Pros: Global work culture, Potential for individual growth, Flexible work hours. Cons: None none. None none. None.
    • “Good for a while.”

      Former Employee — Advisory Software Engineer in Raleigh, NC. I worked at IBM full-time (more than 8 years).

      Pros: A large, truly corporate, profit minded company. Good experience for 3-5 years, then leave as you will fall behind in technology and salary.

      Cons:

      • Project teams are world wide. Meetings are with several different accents — comprehension is a challenge.
      • There is no consistent culture.
      • If you are over 45 you will constantly be looking over your shoulder as to the day you will be laid off.

      Advice to Management: Go back to training managers to be managers (people and project ) as opposed to the management mess that has been there for the last 10 years.

    • “CBD Consultant”

      Former Employee — Consultant in Washington, DC. I worked at IBM full-time (more than a year).

      Pros:

      • Brand name recognition is the biggest pro (makes switching job/applying to school a lot easier).
      • Decent benefits and entry level compensation (including sign-in bonus)
      • Unique and interesting projects available.
      • Hours vary but are usually manageable for Public Sector (cap at 40-44 hours and partially remote)
      • Travel perks (hotel points and mileage)
      • Lots of people your age (if in 20s) in start class

      Cons:

      • Lots of resistance and passive aggressiveness from upper management which can lead to a toxic environment.
      • Lack of variety in projects (especially in public sector where options are severely limited) and difficult process in switching out (tons of paperwork and fighting amongst project managers at times).
      • Lack of career advancement, bonuses, and promotions (a lot of documentation is required to apply for a promotion).
      • Sole focus is on utilization rate (if you're on a capped project, forget about going anywhere).
      • Required training is not applicable or useful (the program mandates an additional 40 hours of online training in addition to training sessions, all of which are in soft skills).
      • High turnover rate and dissatisfaction. (Many entry level people leave right after their 1st or 2nd year since advancement and availability of interesting projects is not too great).
    • “Needs Help”

      Former Employee — Anonymous Employee in Littleton, MA. I worked at IBM full-time (more than 5 years).

      Pros: Good work/life balance, good pay and benefits; generally challenging work with some good co-workers. Few young people, however.

      Cons: Management is totally political. Company is too large and there is too much competition for power/budget leading to a lack of communication and too much infighting.

      Many key "implementers" (the real 'talent'), are billed on an hourly basis to clients and have absolutely no time to share their knowledge; far too many managers protect their turf and staff may literally be held back from changing positions.

      True Leadership is hard to find; most are "playing the game."

      Too many employees are aging, old, outdated, and just show up for their cheese until they can go home. Real innovators seldom stay as they get tired of being surrounded by drones — and again, real talent is too busy for anything but taping things together to get our products to work at the customer's site.

      Most employees there really want to do well, but need real management and support; instead they get too much management and tons of politics that have little to do with their job.

      Advice to Management: Cull the political middle management that offers nothing but lots of talk. Keep the truly talented developers and consultants, even keep a few extra to help build up your support staff. Keep key support staff. Many acquisitions over the years has swelled middle management; few of whom are true leaders. Quit buying back your own stock at its highs and wasting millions $$$ in the process.

    • “Business Operation Manager”

      Current Employee — Business Operations Manager in Washington, DC. I have been working at IBM full-time (more than 10 years).

      Pros: Good people to work with, IT systems are solid, senior management is approachable, ability to work remotely, salary is good (but not great).

      Cons: Benefits are slipping, especially 401K matching only at year end. Similar with bonuses. Traditional HW/SW sales dropping and newer cloud/analytics businesses not filling the gap fast enough. (Sellers are not stepping up).

      Advice to Management: Focus your resource actions on sellers not pulling their weight; still too much good 'ol boy protection. Return 401k matching to pay periods (not year end) consistent with all other companies.

    • “New but growing”

      Current Employee — Java Developer in Monroe, LA. I have been working at IBM full-time (less than a year).

      Pros: Interesting job assignments with challenging tasks. The fellow employees are also super friendly and helpful.

      Cons: Being so new in this area there is lack in the access to equipment and personnel resource that you expect to find at a company of this size. There is no one to talk to about health and benefits locally and they lack a IT department to handle Office materials. You have to provide your own equipment beyond the provided ThinkPad laptop.

      Advice to Management: Build out the infrastructure for you employees before you grow. Its important that people are not left scratching their heads or being force to a vague website when they have questions about business and HR concerns. The facility manager should not be the only one with all the answers.

    • “Big Blue review”

      Former Employee — Project Manager in Sydney (Australia) Recommends Negative Outlook CEO I worked at IBM full-time (more than 10 years).

      Pros: Great learning experiences in dealing with all sorts of people from various business and social cultures. Usually very flexible work/life balance. Learn to operate and achieve success in a highly matrixed and political corporation.

      Cons: Remuneration is not where it should be. For the last 7 of my 15 years there the salary reviews and increases were almost a pointless exercise, and gradually fell well behind the market averages. Some red tape is outdated and limits efficiency. The right people/teams aren't often rewarded and recognised, but rather a "who you know" system.

      Advice to Management: As much as strategic direction comes from the top to help drive the business, those on the ground have great experiences that should be heard at the top to create a stronger balance.

    • “Good short-term employer. Don't stay 20 years like I did”

      Former Employee — Anonymous Employee I worked at IBM full-time. Pros: Good salary. Good work...opportunities. Cons: Employees are treated like robots. Management is unreasonable.
    • “Retired”

      Former Employee — Anonymous Employee in Chicago, IL I worked at IBM part-time (more than 10 years.) Pros: It is great to be treated as a number rather than a person, a caring company, everything is managed as it was years ago, poorly. Cons: You are just a number; HR is told to reduce the work force; age and pay determine who stays and who goes. India's cheap labor has created sub par results for customers. Do they care? Heck no, just sends work as fast as possible offshore. Advice to Management: Work as a team; it is amazing that IBM can return a profit in spite of the ridiculous way it wastes money at all levels.
    • “Consulting by Degrees Program”

      Current Employee — Senior Consultant in Atlanta, GA, I have been working at IBM full-time (more than a year).

      Pros: Great people. Pretty flexible with PTO If in the right situation. Senior leaders don't view age as a inhibitor of role readiness. IBM investing in the right growth initiatives.

      Cons: Many great roles are a byproduct of timing/luck as opposed to aptitude. Unsure if this is more of an indictment of the consulting/"on-the-bench" culture. A lot of PMs view the CbD program almost as plebe year, having them do the grunt "pay your dues" work rather than understanding the end goal of the program is to groom these resources into executive positions.

      Advice to Management: If the program is meant to be a true rotational program, make it rotational. Expose employees to a plethora of different experiences and responsibilities, rather than pigeonholing them for the sake of the bottom line. Also, if you view this as an "executive accelerator program" treat it as such. Project Managers should understand CbDers career goals. Put them in leadership positions if deemed ready, or if there aren't any growth opportunities available, let them seek out opportunities that will advance their career and let them KT that role to another resource.

      You cannot become a leader behind a computer screen. This would require all PMs understanding the end-goal of the rotational program,which is difficult considering IBM's size. This being said, I got extremely lucky to be put on a project with great people, and opportunities to learn and, quite honestly, fail.

      I learned invaluable lessons while in this rotational program that have made me a better person and employee. A lot of my complaints are with how the program is communicated/perceived by most leadership.

    • “Good Bad and Ugly”

      Former Employee — QA Manager in New York, NY.

      Pros: Good: There are many IBM divisions and groups that there are many different career opportunities to keep resources interested. IBM culture embraces employees who have good ideas and are willing to take ownership to implement their ideas.

      Cons: Bad: Over the last few years changes have been made that make it appear that the company doesn't care about their employees; little or no bonus after requiring massive amounts of overtime; 401K company match changed from being paid with each pay period to being paid 12/31 IF you have not left the company or they did not lay you off before that date. Ugly: Currently a lot of the US staff fears for their jobs and the morale is not good.

      Advice to Management: None

    • “Churn rate high”

      Former Employee — Anonymous Employee. Pros: Great resume builder. Experience. Health insurance. Slow. Cons: The turnover rate is high. Everyone is a contractor. No point in trying to be human when interacting because they'll be gone in a month. Max salary is a thing. Good luck trying to move up. Advice to Management: Listen to your people. When they say they need help NOW it doesn't mean start a RFA that won't get looked at until a year down the road.
    • “Trying to stay current”

      Current Employee — STSM in Research Triangle Park, NC. I have been working at IBM full-time (more than 10 years). Pros: IBM continues to reinvent itself when needed. There are always lots of different things to do and new projects to work on. Cons: This transition to Cloud has been slow and rough. IBM continues to try to shoe-horn all its legacy products into the new model, whereas other businesses are more willing to make wholesale changes. Politics and internal competition can be tiresome. Advice to Management: Be bold, make the big changes, quit being so shy and quit clinging to the old business models and products.
    • “IBM

      ” Current Employee — Service Delivery Manager in Phoenix, AZ. I have been working at IBM full-time (more than 10 years). Pros: Current role has a lot flexibility and independence while working on essential projects for clients. Direct management is good and wants to help. Cons: The compensation and growth opportunities have severely worsened in last 3 years. First line managers has limited ways to influence decisions. Advice to Management: The IBMer should not be considered average or a commodity.
    • “Designer — Ohio”

      Current Employee — User Experience Designer in Columbus, OH. I have been working at IBM full-time (more than 3 years). Pros: Flexibility, benefits, job security, great team. Cons: Commuting a long distance, pay is just average, a big company moves slowly sometimes — but they are trying. Advice to Management: Continue in your effort to see things from the bottom up, as well as from the top down.
    • “Poor CEO + Low Morale = Avoid!”

      Current Employee — Senior Consultant in Houston, TX. I have been working at IBM full-time (more than 3 years).

      Pros:

      • Decent benefits package
      • Competitive base salary
      • Name recognition on your resume when you inevitably decide to leave.

      Cons:

      • Low morale that keeps getting lower
      • Lack of employee support from leadership, leading to widespread disapproval of C-suite
      • Corporate policies which indicate mistrust of practitioners (guilty until proven innocent)
      • Archaic evaluation and promotion practices
      • No interest in your personal career or retaining top talent
      • Shrinking talent pool due to lack of innovative work and unwillingness to promote top talent without meeting preset "years served" guidelines
      • Year-end bonuses are virtually non-existent and "raises" barely match inflation
      • No corporate culture or identity.

      Advice to Management:

      • By the time IBM becomes proficient in Cloud, nimbler companies will have cornered the market
      • Stop blaming practitioners for a failing strategy -
      • Move on from Ginni Rometty, 15 quarters of losses and she somehow gets a raise?
      • Do more to keep top talent and show mutual interest in employees' career trajectory.
    • “Security Program Manager”

      Current Employee — Security Patch Advisory Program Manager in Fort Collins, CO. I have been working at IBM (more than 8 years). Pros: Work-life balance. Support of continuing education. Flexible. Cons: Benefits decline. Lack of career opportunities. Decline of leadership. Decline of culture and values. Advice to Management: Value your employees.
    • “Harsh Environment”

      Former Employee — Anonymous Employee. Pros: Smart co-workers, great history, lots of options within the company. Cons: Monthly focus makes short-term decisions the norm
    • “Internship experience at IBM

      ” Current Employee — Back-end Software Developer in Markham, ON (Canada). I have been working at IBM (more than a year).

      Pros:

      • Large company with large diversity of technologies.
      • Lateral movement across the organization is easy.
      • Great work
      • Life balance

      Cons:

      • Hiring freezes preventing external hires.
      • Lack of desire to innovate from some employees.
      • Employee review system based on teams, every team has to have some 'poor' performers.
      • Lack of focus of the User Experience

      Advice to Management:

      • Change employee review system to encourage high performing teams.
      • Increase focus on design and continue to emphasize the importance of usability in products.
  • Alliance for Retired Americans Friday Alert. This week's topics include:
    • Sen. Elizabeth Warren Introduces Bill Providing One-time Payment of $581 to Social Security Beneficiaries, Veterans
    • TPP Text Proves Seniors Are Right to Worry About Higher Prescription Drug Prices
    • Study: Nearly Six in Ten Americans Are Taking Prescription Drugs
    • Ben Carson’s Medicare Plans Draw Scrutiny
    • Maryland/DC Alliance Convention Draws More than 50 Attendees

    Download a PDF version.

New on the Alliance@IBM Site

http://www.endicottalliance.org/thedisintegrationofemploymentinIBM.htm To all Alliance supporters, send and share the above link to the article "The disintegration of employment in IBM" far and wide. Put it on your FaceBook page; send it to newspapers; send it with comments to your political reps and send it to your co-workers. Help break the secrecy of IBM job cuts. Put some pressure on IBM. -Alliance-

Job Cut Reports

  • Comment 11/03/15:

    IBM has definitely crossed the tipping point just recently. Morale was low before, but since the 3Q announcements and allegations that (not surprisingly) the company has been up to some shady accounting (meaning things are even worse than Wall Street knows about); the malaise internally has been as thick as molasses. On conference calls nobody seems to care and many don't show up. Ginny has inferred that if you aren't on Watson, you ain't nothing. The CFO has come right out and said they are engineering a decline in some product areas (everything except Watson?). Or is that like saying after the ship sinks "Yeah we meant to do that..."

    The 4Q deal pipe worldwide is virtually empty. Product teams aren't being given money to fix even serious bugs. The pool for raises and bonuses is now empty going forward, so nobody can expect those. Everyone is being asked to "do less with more" aka do the work of those who are gone.

    I'm sure there are a great many who have their new jobs with other companies lined up for Jan 1 and will say sayonara on Dec 15 when they quality for the 401k match. That will leave the company short, and make things even worse. BUT - it will also give those who are left some power.

    Join the Alliance and give it more strength. Wall St is starting to pick up on the employee morale problem, thanks to the press releases put out by the Alliance. They are our voice, please help them. Something major has to happen to this company soon, so let's organize so that those who are left have a voice to prevent this massive executive abuse of power and workers from happening again. It's only a few bucks a month. Don't sit around and wait for the big cut in January. If you get axed then, you can cancel if you feel you need to. Many stay on just to spite IBM. Please join those of us who have proudly joined. -ReadTheTeaLeaves-

  • Comment 11/03/15:

    Location: GTS North America Northeast Region. Attended a required call today where we were told IBM's 401k contributions will be cut to 3% from 6% starting in 2016. No indication whether or not this is company wide or just a GTS initiative. And not clear if it was everyone in GTS or just us lucky ones who got to see our future retirement plans cut in half. -Anonymous-
  • Comment 11/05/15:

    "Engineering a decline" in all areas other than CAMSS appears to be the truth. The execs are actively end-of-lifing profitable legacy products if they aren't in CAMSS. Assumedly this will make the CAMSS percentage of revenue higher, so Ginni can claim the revenue mix is "shifting" to CAMSS even while overall revenue and profitability continue to plummet (due to their "engineering a decline" actions — hey, they finally found an action the IBM execs are actually good at!) Employee Engagement survey results to date are very, very low. I don't think IBM will survive in its current form for many more years, unless the BOD replaces all the top executives. No company can survive when 95% of its employees hate its ****ing guts. -Writing_On_the_Wall-
  • Comment 11/05/15:

    Job Title: Retired Secretary. When and why did IBM cancel the IBM Special Equity Grant of stocks awarded to all IBMers around the world in June, 2011 to coincide with IBM's 100th anniversary that would have vested December 1, 2015? -Anonymous-
  • Comment 11/05/15:

    Job Title: Minion; Location: Work from Home; Customer Account: Large Healthcare Account; Business Unit: GTS; Product Line: SSO. Message: On a call with first-line manager yesterday, 401(k) match being cut in half. Anyone currently working from home who lives within 50 miles of a Global Delivery Center will have to work at assigned GDC. No more work from home beginning in new year. -Shot Down Duck-
  • Comment 11/05/15:

    Job Title: PM; Location: Michigan. Message: If you were in the Pension Credit Formula (PCF) or prior plan it is even worse. Used to be you received 6% match (now reduced to 2%) and 4% automatic (now reduced to 1%); of course this is to remain competitive. So instead of getting 10% contributed each Dec I now will receive 3%. Yikes. -Anonymous-
  • Comment 11/05/15:

    In the last couple of weeks, phone conferences have taken place to inform that overtime is indefinitely frozen in GTS and ES. As of this week, non-exempt employees are to cease working and claiming OT. It appears, as some had thought initially, that the lost 15% from the reclassification is now officially a pay cut. -Anonymous-
  • Comment 11/05/15:

    The 401K match for the GTS group is going from 6% match to 2% match. I used to get an additional 2% for IBM pension contribution. (That all depended on which prior pension plan you were in before they did away with all of them). So actually I get 8% total now. But starting 1/1/16 that will change to 2% match and 1% pension contribution. This was all announced via a 15-minute pre-recorded cc presentation.

    There was no Q/A after, and no replay or recording made available of the announcement. GDP is changing too. Quarterly instead of yearly, with all the "ifs" attached as always. Hope everybody filled out the IBMer Engagement Pulse survey and let them know how you feel about this wonderful company. Not that it matters to them, but its enjoyable to fill out anyway. -GTS - going to s____-

  • Comment 11/05/15:

    It has been a while since I checked this site. Heard rumors of 401k match being cut, checked into see if any postings and saw previous post GTS already announced it. Seems we will all take another hit soon. -Scrooged-

Posts from the Alliance@IBM's Facebook Page

  • Allianceibm CWA:

    Sent to the Alliance: Mandatory conference call yesterday with everything communicated verbally, nothing in writing. They are redesigning the bonus plans (per quarter and dependent on quarterly results), that replaces the GDP. They are also cutting the 401(k) match from 5% to 2% (keeping the 1% automatic contribution). Their rationale is that the 5% match is double what the market offers, and they need to remain competitive.

    This is a pilot that they are pushing on the GTS organization only, effective 1/01/16. Very likely they will roll it out to everyone.

    • More Big Blue doublespeak! Any mention of cutting executive compensation?
    • So IBM cuts benefits because "we're more than competitive with the market." Cue announcements from "the market" about cutting benefits to "match industry trend-setter IBM" in ten, nine, eight...
    • Guess I got off the sinking ship at the right time. Damn.
    • Just another in a long list of reasons I'm glad to be gone.
  • Allianceibm CWA:

    The Alliance is hearing of GTS being renamed and reorg-ed. Also dropping matching TDSP to 1% for "competitive reasons". Send info to ibmunionalliance@gmail.com
    • I heard 3%, not 1%.
If you hire good people and treat them well, they will try to do a good job. They will stimulate one another by their vigor and example. They will set a fast pace for themselves. Then if they are well led and occasionally inspired, if they understand what the company is trying to do and know they will share in its sucess, they will contribute in a major way. The customer will get the superior service he is looking for. The result is profit to customers, employees, and to stcckholders. —Thomas J. Watson, Jr., from A Business and Its Beliefs: The Ideas That Helped Build IBM.

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