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6, 2000 April, 2000

Highlights—October 17, 2015

  • Wall Street Journal:

    IBM Allows Chinese Government to Review Source Code. China has been pressuring U.S. tech companies to hand over source code to prove there are no security risks. By Eva Dou. Excerpts: International Business Machines Corp. has agreed to let China review some product source code in a secure room, according to two people briefed on the practice, making it the first major U.S. tech company to comply with Beijing’s recent demands for a stronger hand in foreign technology there.

    IBM has begun allowing officials from China’s Ministry of Industry and Information Technology to examine proprietary source code—the secret sauce behind its software—in a controlled space without the ability to remove it from the room, the people said. It wasn’t clear which products IBM was allowing reviews of or how much time ministry officials can spend looking at the code. The people said the practice was new and implemented recently.

    IBM Greater China General Manager Shally Wang referred questions to the company’s media-relations office on Friday. An IBM China spokesman didn’t respond to requests for comment. Officials at the Chinese ministry didn’t respond to a request for comment. ...

    IBM’s move could rile the Obama administration and some other U.S. tech firms, which have been trying to present a united front against Beijing’s demands for technology sharing. Many U.S. companies are drawn to the massive Chinese information-technology market, which research firm Forrester estimated is worth $136 billion this year. But they worry that allowing access to sensitive material like source codes will put their proprietary information in the hands of Chinese rivals and essentially help future competitors.

    IBM has been willing to strike closer partnerships with China’s government than many of its fellow U.S. tech companies, people familiar with the company’s strategy said.

  • Columbia Daily Tribune:

    IBM's Columbia employment numbers drop again. By Alicia Stice. Excerpts: 2015 had a rough start for employees at IBM’s Columbia service center, which endured several rounds of widespread layoffs. Based on a new jobs report, things do not appear to be improving for the company that once predicted it would create 800 well-paying jobs in Columbia by the end of 2012.

    The Columbia center has experienced another dip in employment, according to a job report submitted to the state this month. As of June 30, IBM had only 388 full-time employees at its Columbia center, 65 fewer than in March and 219 fewer than in February 2014. The drop is significant enough that IBM has lost another of the incentives the state used to lure it to Columbia back in 2010.

    The state earlier this year suspended IBM’s last remaining tax credit, which was designed to help it secure funds for infrastructure and capital improvements. After the Missouri Department of Economic Development verified IBM’s latest job report Oct. 1, the department halted another program.

    “The fourth workforce training project has been deactivated and will remain deactivated until the company reaches employment levels at or above 400,” Department of Economic Development spokeswoman Amy Susan said in an email. “If they do not reach this minimum in the next year, their last training project will become permanently deactivated.” ...

    IBM spokesman Clint Roswell offered no comment and said IBM does not publicly release employment information.

    “Any information you seek about IBM employee numbers in Columbia will have to come from the state,” he wrote in an email.

    The notoriously secretive company came to Columbia after the city and state teamed up in 2010 to create an incentives package worth up to $31.2 million, assuming IBM met certain benchmarks. That package included a $3 million building the city purchased to house IBM. At the time, company officials said they expected the service center to create about 800 jobs in Columbia, a target IBM never has hit.

    In January, the company made deep cuts across the board, including layoffs at the Columbia service center. The state, which had doled out about $10 million in incentives, investigated the company’s job numbers and in April suspended its last remaining tax credit.

  • Poughkeepsie Journal:

    GlobalFoundries cuts workers despite NY jobs pledge with IBM. By Joseph Spector. Excerpts: Expected layoffs by GlobalFoundries in New York has left local leaders uncertain whether the cuts would infringe upon an agreement the company inherited from IBM to protect jobs through 2016.

    GlobalFoundries, the Abu Dhabi-owned semiconductor company, announced Monday that it plans to cut a “very minor” number of U.S. workers, including at its East Fishkill plant that it obtained July 1.

    When IBM paid GlobalFoundries $1.5 billion to take over the East Fishkill plant and a plant near Burlington, Vt. off its hands, it also agreed to oblige by a deal between IBM and New York to maintain 3,100 high-tech jobs in the Hudson Valley and surrounding areas through 2016.

    The deal was part of IBM’s expansion in Buffalo to create 500 jobs at a $55 million high-tech hub in exchange for state incentives. ...

    The extent of the jobs cuts in New York is unknown, but it is drawing the ire of local leaders just months after GlobalFoundries vowed to uphold the deal with IBM, which is headquartered in Armonk, Westchester County.

  • Bloomberg Business:

    IBM's Newest Acquisition Warned on Device by U.S. Health Agency. By Jing Cao and Anna Edney. Excerpts: Merge Healthcare Inc., purchased by IBM for $1 billion in a deal completed Tuesday, received a warning letter from U.S. regulators about the potential dangers of software that monitors patients during heart procedures and a system that archives medical images.

    Merge failed to show that it had adequately reviewed or evaluated complaints of malfunctions in its devices and allowed its Merge Hemo cardiac monitoring system to be widely used on patients when its effectiveness hadn’t been supported, according to the Food and Drug Administration’s letter dated Sept. 30. Merge also neglected to inform the FDA when the company recalled the product because it may cause computer systems to freeze and result in a loss of patients’ vital signs while the system reboots, the agency said. The warning letter came after a June inspection of Merge’s factory in Hartland, Wisconsin.

    International Business Machines Corp. agreed in August to buy Chicago-based Merge and incorporate its imaging platform into IBM’s Watson Health business unit. The acquisition, part of IBM’s effort to bolster its health-care data and analytics offerings, is the third-biggest for Chief Executive Officer Ginni Rometty since she took the top role in 2012, according to data compiled by Bloomberg. ...

    Steve Tomasco, a spokesman for IBM, declined to comment on the letter.

  • Yahoo! Finance:

    IBM CEO Ginny Rometty doesn't really care that Dell is buying EMC. By Julie Bort. Excerpts: IBM CEO Ginny Rometty isn't terribly concerned that her competitor Dell is buying her other competitor, EMC, in a $67 billion deal that will create a mammoth company.

    Rometty was talking at Fortune's Most Powerful Women Summit going on this week in Washington, D.C. when her interviewer, Fortune editor Alan Murray, asked her about the merger.

    Rometty shrugged it off.

  • Fortune:

    Amazon is 'old' tech's worst enemy. By Barb Darrow. While Amazon’s cloud eats the world, old-world tech companies ponder mergers and acquisitions, divestitures, and split-ups. Excerpts: “Most technology companies, particularly the old guard technology companies, have lost their will and their DNA to invent. They acquire,” said Jassy, who is senior vice president of Amazon Web Services at a press event on AWS Re:invent on Wednesday.

    The reported Dell-EMC deal, one that neither company has confirmed, epitomizes the sort of financial engineering that has inflamed older tech companies of late. Companies like EMC, IBM, and Hewlett-Packard garner headlines more for their M&A activity (or litigation) than for their new products and services.

    HP is busily cutting itself into two companies while IBM generates press releases about acquisitions and new Watson business units at a fearsome clip. And Dell, with Silver Lake Partners, spent the better part of 2013 taking itself private and is now apparently in hot pursuit of EMC. ...

    So maybe it’s just optics, but it sure seems that Amazon has been building new cloud services while these legacy players have been distracted by financial and legal moves that don’t bring new and better product to market faster. Of course all those other companies are burdened (blessed?) with legacy products that have become less relevant in an age of consolidating compute and storage power in public clouds running commodity hardware, so they have to figure out how to move into this new world while lugging all that baggage.

  • The Economic Times (India):

    IBM wakes up to startup rush in India, to set up first cloud centre in Chennai. By Anirban Sen. Excerpts: International Business Machines, the world's largest technology services company, is looking to engage more actively with Indian startups for new, disruptive technologies and is open to buying out companies in the country to acquire solutions that it may not own already, its head of cloud computing said in an interview.

    "Absolutely," said Robert Le-Blanc, senior vice-president of IBM Cloud, when asked about the possibility of acquisitions in India. "We tend not to invest in (startups) because we don't want to be like a VC, but we identify gaps.

  • Glassdoor IBM reviews. Selected reviews follow:
    • “These reviews for IBM are bogus”

      Current Employee — Senior IT Architect in Remote, OR. I have been working at IBM full-time. Pros: IBM used to be a great company to work for. Cons: In the last five years, I have not met a single IBM employee who liked working for IBM. I find the results published here, 56% of employees would recommend IBM to a friend, impossible to believe given my experience. Every IBM employee is overworked, under compensated and lives in constant fear that they will be the next person to get laid off in IBM's never ending layoffs. There is no time off at IBM. Most Global Business Systems (GBS) departments (if not all) demand 118% utilization rates. Time taken for any vacation day or holiday has to be made up. Morale at IBM is so low, IBM has stopped publishing the results of internal IBM surveys. Advice to Management: Treat people with respect. Bring back work-life balance.
    • “IBM was good...but not now”

      Current Employee — Team Leader in Brno (Czech Republic). I have been working at IBM (more than a year). Pros: Multicultural environment, good place where to learn (but not to grow). Cons: The management is really poor, there is no flexibility. Advice to Management: The management should take more care about people.
    • “IBM not good as old or before 2008”

      Current Employee — TMG Analyst in Bangalore (India). I have been working at IBM full-time (more than 8 years). Pros: No pros as you would be surprised. No attraction left any more. Cons: No transport employees at low level are looked like daily wages labour. No hike (single-digit which wont increase your monthly salary by even 500 RS). No Transparency. No HR. Managers are demigods. Don't make fool of yourself by joining. Their next theme is to sell water to employees 2 Rs/cup. No future. Advice to Management: I am not big enough to advice you as I am the lowest level in the 10-level management hierarchical structure. That means 10 steps down from president.
    • “Pathetic company to work with”

      Current Employee — IT Specialist in Brno (Czech Republic). I have been working at IBM (less than a year).

      Pros: Learning centre. No other pros...other than the one mentioned above.

      Cons: Management is totally Czech based...on paper diversity. No cultural ethics within the team. Make you feel out of place every time you try to interact...will always demotivate you. If team lead is Czech I think it would be better if it is out of Czech they will lick Czechs like anything.

    • “Working for IBM STG”

      Former Employee — Anonymous Employee in Armonk, NY. I worked at IBM (more than 3 years). Pros: Large respected technology firm with a very broad product line. Cons: Repeated 'resource adjustments' made working for a company where continued employment was once the norm very uncomfortable. RA layoffs were also very disruptive. Advice to Management: Return IBM to its former glory by focusing on long term profitability through steady growth and development.
    • “Product Manager”

      Former Employee — Anonymous Employee in La Chapelle-d'Abondance (France). I worked at IBM (less than a year). Pros: Some areas of interesting work, but the company remains in broad decline as a result of missing the move to cloud. Cons: Cost control is brutal and that can make it pretty hard to get the job done. Administration is very heavy. Even people at the VP level have very little ability to make change. Advice to Management: The balance between shareholders, management, other employees and customers is not working. Fear in the workforce due to frequent small layoffs and a lack of excitement about the mission are widespread.
    • “Software Engineer”

      Former Employee — Software Engineer in Cleveland, OH. I worked at IBM full-time (more than a year). Pros: Came in as part of an acquisition. Worked on an interesting product part of a team of smart people. Great work-life balance. Generally IBM is okay with working from home, and moving around within the company is easy to do if that's what you desire. Cons: Pay was a little low. Felt constantly bottle-necked by unnecessary processes. IBM was extremely stingy with new hires, refusing to allow it even when the team was being crushed by a rapidly growing customer base.
    • “Customer support”

      Former Employee — Helpdesk Technician in Dublin (Ireland). I worked at IBM (more than a year). Pros: Flexible, learn new tools, weekly pay no weekend or shift work. Cons: Room for growth, micromanagement, high staff turnover, little training, no bonuses. Advice to Management: Better training and less management more bonuses.
    • “Not the company it used to be”

      Former Employee — Tape Test Engineer and New Product Launch in Milpitas, CA. I worked at IBM full-time (more than 10 years).

      Pros: Easy hours, come and go as you please as long as you get your work done. Good work/life balance.

      Cons: Pay is at least 1/3 lower than the rest of the industry, unless you are a new hire. Management has no interest in career development for most of their employees, only for certain people in the organization. Promotions are few and far between. Many employees just waiting around to get laid off so they can get a (severance) package and then retire. Future of the company is uncertain.

      Advice to Management: Wake up! You need to value all your employees, not just the squeaky wheels in the organization.

    • “Blah”

      Former Employee — Anonymous Employee. I worked at IBM (more than 10 years). Pros: Decent salary. Good benefits if you weren't a new hire. Most of the pros were also cons. Cons: No room for growth at all. Minimal chance for raises/bonuses I was blocked from moving to other divisions that were doing better. Slow erosion of benefits.
    • “Supply Chain Consultant”

      Former Employee — Managing Consultant in Southfield, MI. I worked at IBM full-time (more than 10 years). Pros: Great people, great teams, challenging projects. Cons: You're just a number, not much interaction with your manager, no real career planning — you can lay out a plan however assignments do not consider your desires.
    • “No career opportunities”

      Current Employee — Senior Project Manager in São Paulo (Brazil). I have been working at IBM full-time (more than 10 years). Pros: Flexible hours. Home office when possible. Average to good team environment. Average to good basic incentives (but bellow average income). Cons: Too bureaucratic. No opportunities. Slow career progression. Bellow average income. No differentiation and no retention fir good talents. Management got lost and just keep control of short term goals (monthly revenue and budget). Advice to Management: Create a strategy. Think long term!
    • “Great experience”

      Current Employee — Technical Consultant. Pros: Good brand, access to a huge network of colleagues, and respect from the marketplace. It's great experience because the longer you stay the better the opportunities to leave are. As of this post IBM is also rapidly renewing itself, and offers Macs and Web mail that beats Gmail.

      Cons: Not all IBMers and IBM departments are created equal. There is a lot of disillusionment. Also a big company like IBM, while certain areas might be bleeding edge, inertia keeps other parts back at least 20 years. There is a lot bureaucracy and even duplication of effort.

      Advice to Management: Make everything simple. Reduce hierarchy. Make departments international. Make IBM a place where the opportunities to stay get greater and greater the longer you stay.

    • “Associate System Engineer”

      Current Employee — Associate Systems Engineer in Pune (India). I have been working at IBM (more than a year).

      Pros: Team work, good atmosphere, nice colleagues...you will get used to the culture pretty fast and adjust yourself.

      Cons: There is nothing bad as such...it depends upon you how do you take things...at some points you have to ignore things and move on.

      Advice to Management: Please do proper management...you cannot treat resources like teddy bears...all have some plans so let your plans be proper.

    • “Varying shades of blue...”

      Current Employee — Anonymous Employee.

      Pros: IBM has a lot of job possibilities to offer. The company is over 400,000+ employees. IBM deals with state of the art tech you will not find at other companies. The shear volume of customers will give you a huge amount experience that you can not get at smaller companies.

      Cons: People are just numbers or assets to be used and discarded as needed. This is true for most major companies, so just be prepared. The focus is on cost/profit so depending what business unit you work for you could be expected to do the work of a number of people. It can be hard and grueling at times.

      Advice to Management: Senior management needs to understand that the people are the foundation of the company. The bean counters (accountants) should not be running the direction of the company they should be assisting it.

    • “IBM Global Services”

      Current Employee — Program Manager in Louisville, KY. I have been working at IBM full-time (more than 10 years).

      Pros: High performance team. Highly skilled, highly effective. You can place a team of IBMers from anywhere in the world into a room. Within 5 minutes they will be up and running as a team. The culture to function as a team is highly developed organization wide.

      Cons: Three is significant economic uncertainty. You never know when the next shoe will drop and IBM has not had any good economic news in decades.

      Advice to Management: IBM has excellent talent. Focus on market needs and leverage your existing talent. They are up to the challenge to make IBM great.

    • “Project manager”

      Former Employee — Anonymous Employee. Pros: Good environment, fun and family friendly. Cons: Long hours, pay not up to industry standards.
    • “Great company”

      Current Employee — Anonymous Employee in New York, NY. I have been working at IBM full-time (more than 5 years). Pros: Can't say enough about how IBM has helped my professional and personal life. Great company with smart and talented people. Cons: Long hours and recent instability. Advice to Management: More employee recognition programs.
    • “Not the same company it was a decade ago. Benefits shrinking, pay stagnant, no perks whatsoever.”

      Current Employee — Advisory Software Engineer (Band 8) in Endicott, NY. I have been working at IBM full-time (more than 10 years).

      Pros: Somewhat flexible hours...but that flexibility is shrinking each year. Peers are considerate and want to help one another but management is self serving. IBM lacks likable managers who actually care about their employees.

      Cons: Do more with less people corporate mentality. Inconsistent rating system...rated average one year and received 1% raise...rated above average the next year and received 1% raise. That demotivates employees.

      Advice to Management: People are your greatest resources; invest in them.

    • “Have a clear career trajectory in mind”

      Current Employee — Anonymous Employee in Sydney (Australia). I have been working at IBM (more than 10 years). Fantastic people. Family orientated environment. Strong legacy, excellent customer base. Great place to learn from others and develop your own personal brand. Cons: Slow to adapt to changing industry complexion. Can be political. Advice to Management: Fail and adapt fast. Listen and apply advice. Listen to your people. Be willing to invest and push back on ideas from the top that don't make sense to your specific business conditions.
    • “Respect”

      Current Employee — Anonymous Employee. I have been working at IBM full-time (more than 10 years). Pros: Location is close to home. Cons: Constantly crying poverty. Making equivalent of what I made in 1998. Advice to Management: Start treating employees the way they were treated 25 years ago, with respect and reward for good work.
    • “Great for experience, Poor Compensation”

      Current Employee — Anonymous Employee in Stamford, CT. I have been working at IBM (less than a year). Pros: Great non-paycheck benefits and coworkers are very intelligent and hardworking. Cons: No bonuses and lack of raises.
    • “Good for experience but not a long term career”

      Current Employee — Software Developer. I have been working at IBM (more than 3 years). Pros: Good benefits, and flex time. Cons: Every division is different, but there isn't much career path laid out. It's either hop to a different division for a promotion or stay stuck at the current position/pay.
    • “Business Development”

      Current Employee — Anonymous Employee. Pros: Great place to be if you like being on the bleeding edge of technology. Cons: They do not care one bit about their employees. The company is run by bean counters. Advice to Management: Start investing in your on-shore people. We are losing too many talented people.
    • “IBM delivery centers”

      Current Employee — Applications Developer. I have been working at IBM full-time (more than 3 years).

      Pros: They are very good about hiring inexperienced people. A good place to get your foot in the door if you are new to the industry. IBM always looks good on a resume and head hunters will frequently recruit from there.

      Cons: The pay at the delivery centers is a good 30% below that of the industry average. Pay at the delivery centers also seems to be substantially lower than at normal IBM. Most jobs are working on client teams and can end unexpectedly and it is up to you to get yourself on a new team or else you employment will end.

      They also tend to hire people with low skill sets and try to sell them as senior programmers to clients. Training is spotty at best, so expect to spend your own time training yourself. And employees are expected to work a minimum of 44 hours a week. If you don't achieve this, you can expect to not be promoted. Getting promoted out of the center is next to impossible. Most leave for other jobs.

      Advice to Management: If you plan on hiring low skill set people, then provide better training. Otherwise, hire experienced programmers. And pay better and you will prevent the massive turnover that the center has.

    • “Sweatshop!”

      Former Employee — Transition Project Manager in Endicott, NY. I worked at IBM full-time (more than 5 years). Pros: High caliber clients and experiences. Cons: Low pay; low increases; extensive hours and travel requirements.
    • “Pros and Cons”

      Former Employee — Business Analyst in Minneapolis, MN. I worked at IBM full-time (more than 10 years). Pros: You will be paid an average salary and be exposed to many types of process. Cons: You will be overworked and then (most likely) outsourced after you build your position or process to the point of it being transferred to cheaper countries or cheaper service centers. Advice to Management: Retain, retain, retain talent! I spent 14 years with IBM and gained expertise. My reward: laid off and my job outsourced. You get what you pay for and from what I see in the industry, your reputation is not what it used to be. Move over old school — the young IT companies are pounding on the door.
    • “Excellent Working Environment”

      Former Employee — Managing Consultant in Armonk, NY. I worked at IBM (more than a year) Pros: - Learn new technologies; - Get involved in high-profile projects; - Process-driven working environment; - Great opportunities within the organization; - Excellent comp and benefits. Cons: - Long work hours; - Organizational structure is daunting; - Too much work. Advice to Management: We're human, too. We have lives and families and the same college degrees you have. Don't treat us like machines.
    • “IBM — the slow decline of a once great company”

      Former Employee — Anonymous Employee in Columbia, MO. I worked at IBM full-time (more than 3 years).

      Pros: Good Benefits. Throughout the company, there are islands of excellence. The ability to interact with some truly brilliant people on those islands. I was able to learn a great deal about some technical issues because of the IBM connections in a day or two — it would have taken a month or more, otherwise. There are a good number of individuals at IBM that *really* know their stuff!

      Cons: Their review system is a joke. Ratings are predetermined, have less to do with your personal job performance and much more to do with your managers' personal agenda. Overly bureaucratic. Management is more concerned with checking boxes and CYA than with actual results. Employees can and do get blamed for issues that are totally outside of their control. Unstable work environment — the "Resource Actions" will continue, as will the practice of having employees train their low cost, less skilled overseas replacements unless they want to lose their severance packages.

      Advice to Management: Get your golden parachute in order — you will need it!

  • New York Times:

    To Reduce the Cost of Drugs, Look to Europe. By Austin Frakt. Excerpts: When anyone proposes reducing prescription drug prices — as Hillary Rodham Clinton and Bernie Sanders recently have — the most commonly heard criticism is that it would squelch innovation. But not all pharmaceutical innovation is valuable. Though some drugs are breakthroughs, some offer only marginal benefits at exorbitant cost.

    There is a way to keep prices low while encouraging drug companies to innovate: Look to Europe and elsewhere, where drug prices are a fraction of those in the United States. Germany, Spain, Italy and a half dozen other countries have pushed drug prices lower with a system called reference pricing. It has led to drug price decreases and significant savings in the Canadian province of British Columbia as well as in Germany, Italy, Norway, Spain and Sweden. A study published in the American Journal of Managed Care found that price reductions ranged from 7 percent to 24 percent. ...

    In pushing prices down, reference pricing doesn’t suppress innovation; it encourages a different form of it. The market still rewards the invention of a cutting-edge drug with novel therapeutic effects. Such a drug might be placed in a new class and therefore could be priced high. But, within classes, the market also rewards innovations that lead to lower-priced drugs, because consumers switch to them to avoid out-of-pocket costs. In these ways, reference pricing promotes cost-effectiveness.

  • Alliance for Retired Americans Friday Alert. This week's topics include:
    • SSA Announces 0% COLA in 2016, Triggering Major Cost Increases for Medicare Beneficiaries
    • Republicans in U.S. House and Senate Plan Ways to Cut Social Security, Medicare and Medicaid
    • First Democratic Debate Touches on Expanding Social Security
    • Washington State Alliance, APWU Hold Conventions

    Download a PDF version.

New on the Alliance@IBM Site

http://www.endicottalliance.org/thedisintegrationofemploymentinIBM.htm To all Alliance supporters, send and share the above link to the article "The disintegration of employment in IBM" far and wide. Put it on your FaceBook page; send it to newspapers; send it with comments to your political reps and send it to your co-workers. Help break the secrecy of IBM job cuts. Put some pressure on IBM. -Alliance-

Job Cut Reports

  • Comment 10/10/15:

    In one day's worth of announcements at its annual AWS keynote conference Amazon has effectively nullified ALL the recent IBM cloud, analytics, and security-related announcements. Amazon developed in-house, cohesive out-of-the box vs IBM's purchasing companies and bolting on. This completely undermines IBM's promised deliverables in these arenas which in turn affects promised revenue growth, employee retention, etc. http://venturebeat.com/2015/10/07/aws-reinvent-2015/ -Leftin14-
  • Comment 10/13/15:

    Location: US; Business Unit: GBS; Message: GBS Associate Partners (or Band 10s) and Partners being RA'ed this week. Only 2 weeks notice. Bluepages already shows their direct reports removed from them. Has IBM finally learned the pyramid was upside down? -Anonymous-
  • Comment 10/14/15:

    Job Title: IT Specialist. Message: All of you who thought you were "safe" just a few months ago because you are working in the CAMSS area, can now go ahead and stress out like everyone else. Ginny has now announced that "Cognitive" is the company's real savior and push to "reinvent" the company. So you can read into it that CAMSS is oh so passe in her mind, and yesterday's news.

    There is a growing push for breaking the company up, by activists or otherwise. The Dell/EMC deal was a strong drumbeat. Amazon's announcements usurp everything IBM has going on. Watson is smart, but my phone can answer just about any question I can throw at it, without spending a billion to teach it first. Siri, Cortana, and Google can all do that.

    The 3Q results call on Monday should be interesting. You can look into the 4Q pipe and see the sky on the other side, it's so empty. In the mean time, do something constructive and help the Alliance help us. Spend a few bucks a month. If you get cut, at least you'll know you did *something* other than just sit there like a lamb being led to slaughter. Fight back. -ReadTheTeaLeaves-

  • Comment 10/16/15:

    My manager is pushing a new tool on us. I am trying to research it but it looks like we will be inputting all of our moment by moment activities in TVC. Has anybody else heard of this? Seems to be a data collection tool to justify getting rid of more of us. -Still here-
  • Comment 10/17/15:

    -Still here- Oh, yeah, the GDFs have done this already. Wonder if they are tallying your keystrokes now to the minute and timing your restroom visits? -Anonymous-
  • Comment 10/17/15:

    Job Title: IT Specialist. @StillHere - Yes, we are required to account for 8 hours per day in the TvC Tool on the account I support. FLMs are also required to use it. "Management" is using the reporting out of this tool to assess productivity. You can be sure no good will come of this for IBM employees. -Anonymous-
If you hire good people and treat them well, they will try to do a good job. They will stimulate one another by their vigor and example. They will set a fast pace for themselves. Then if they are well led and occasionally inspired, if they understand what the company is trying to do and know they will share in its sucess, they will contribute in a major way. The customer will get the superior service he is looking for. The result is profit to customers, employees, and to stcckholders. —Thomas J. Watson, Jr., from A Business and Its Beliefs: The Ideas That Helped Build IBM.

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