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Highlights—July 26, 2014

  • Bloomberg:

    IBM Said to Reject Globalfoundries Offer for Chip Unit. By Ian King and Alex Barinka. Excerpts: International Business Machines Corp.’s talks to sell its money-losing chip-manufacturing operations to Globalfoundries Inc. have ended after the two companies failed to agree on terms, according to people familiar with the process.

    Globalfoundries, owned by an investment arm of the government of Abu Dhabi, made an offer that was rejected by IBM as too low, said the people, who asked not to be identified because the negotiations are private. James Sciales, a spokesman for IBM, and Kevin Kimball, a spokesman for Santa Clara, California-based Globalfoundries, both declined to comment on speculation.

    The breakdown of the talks is a setback for IBM Chief Executive Officer Ginni Rometty as she attempts to meet 2015 earnings goals by shedding less profitable units and reversing nine straight quarters of revenue declines. Globalfoundries, which has its own plant in New York state, had placed little or no value on IBM’s factories because they are too old, the person said.

    A selected reader comment follows:

    • It takes $5 to 7 billion to build a new semiconductor manufacturing line, just under a billion to maintain it. IBM has been barely maintaining their old manufacturing lines. Those barely maintained lines are obsolete. Now, IBM wants top dollar for old and obsolete lines for technology that is no longer used or just used to produce low technology commodity chips.

      You would think IBM would learn after Lenovo walked away from the sale of Intel/AMD servers (system x) the first time. IBM was asking $6.5 Billion, and not for all of the system x business, but subsequently Lenovo got it all for $2.3 billion. Now the Lenovo deal is hung up with CFIUS review and Global Foundries just walked.

      I bet both sales were booked in the RoadKill 2015 strategy. Poor Ginni, everything is falling apart on hers and Sammie baby strategy. I see some shorts in the crystal ball for IBM.

  • Poughkeepsie Journal:

    GlobalFoundries hires 3 more IBM execs. By Craig Wolf. Excerpts: Three IBM Corp. executives from its Microelectronics Division are heading north to work at Global­Foundries' expanding plant in the Saratoga County Town of Malta in the latest sign that the chip industry is diminishing in the mid-Hudson and heading upstate.

    GlobalFoundries announced the hires Wednesday, hailing the three as "industry veterans" who would help the company ramp up its operations at the plant, called Fab 8.

    The background is that the two companies were reported to have been negotiating a deal to transfer IBM's chip manufacturing operations to Global. The Poughkeepsie Journal has reported that the deal hit a snag. But that has not stopped GlobalFoundries from trying to get hold of chip talent from IBM. And it leaves unanswered all questions about the future of the East Fishkill IBM plant and its workers.

    The hires were announced by Tom Caulfield, Global's senior vice president and general manager of Fab 8, himself a former IBMer.

    The hires were Mark Dougherty, who comes from the East Fishkill site where he worked on unit process development; George Jordhamo, who worked on radio frequency and silicon germanium chip specialty products; and Debra Leach Riell, who has been director of IBM's microelectronics production procurement. Riell's LinkedIn page identifies her as a Dutchess resident. Jordhamo has connections both at East Fishkill and Burlington.

  • Daily Mail (United Kingdom):

    Female coder live-tweets overheard sexist remarks 'made by lunching IBM execs' who refuse to hire young women because they 'get pregnant again and again and again'. By Louise Boyle. Excerpts: A group of IBM execs underestimated the all-pervading power of the Internet when they obliviously made loudmouth sexist remarks during a business lunch - which were overheard and subsequently live-tweeted by a furious female coder at the next table.

    Lyndsay Kirkham, an editor and freelance web developer in Toronto, had her birthday lunch ruined on Monday as she listened to the 'Big Blue' suits explain that they don't hire young women because 'they are just going to get themselves pregnant again and again and again'.

    Ms Kirkham, a mother to five-year-old Aodhan, wrote: 'These executives are so comfortable in the sexism that they are openly sharing. Wow. My disbelief is tempering my anger. #IBM.'

    Ms Kirkham had just sat down to lunch at the Richtree restaurant in Toronto with her son and her son's father, when she heard two men at the table next to her being 'obnoxiously loudly and belligerent' about their hiring strategies. ...

    An IBM spokesperson told MailOnline: 'The views expressed in this reported conversation have nothing to do with how we operate our business in Canada or anywhere else. IBM does not tolerate discrimination of any kind.'

  • LinkedIn's IBMer group:

    What can IBM do to retain its employees, especially the recent hires? Selected comments follow:
    • Information Technology Specialist. A few years ago I asked someone why they decided to leave rather than stick with IBM. Below is their answer. The question that was presented to them was 'Why not look for another job in IBM?'

      It has been a pretty crappy company to work for, with all the cost cutting and layoffs. I was being put on the RA list despite having a 2+ PBC and getting rave reviews from the account team that I worked with. After I got off the RA list, they took me off the account and gave me some back office process job to do.

      I heard of a job opening and pursued it (non-IBM). They made me an offer and it sounds like a job I am really going to enjoy. Working with local clients, working with them on solutioning, and implementation. It is a bump in pay. It is local travel. It is getting out of my home office on some days. It is still work at home flexibility. It is working with a local manager instead of IBM, where you never meet your manager.

      Considering the events and current IBM climate, I need a change of scenery (and this came up). I would be an idiot not to grab it, so I did and we will let the chips fall where they may. I hope I enjoy it and find it fulfilling.

      IBM's current choice is Roadmap 2015 vs. employment growth. Our former colleague chose their employer elsewhere. If I were a recent hire I, too, would question long term IBM employment, I mean, it is either having an IBM career or long term employment, period. Does long term employment exist for you elsewhere?

    • Systems Manager at The Folio Society Ltd. Money is not the ultimate reason for staying in a job, job satisfaction and being appreciated by your employer come top in all surveys. They need to do some of the little things like giving employees free tea, coffee and hot water and contribute something to the Christmas parties. These may sound like little things, but I'm telling you as someone who worked for IBM for 5 years, these are the biggest topics of conversation and the thing that p...ses people off the most. Q4 in 2010 IBM had a NET income of $5.3 Billion and they can't give their employees tea, coffee and milk? How do you keep your employees? Make them feel like they want to stay.
    • Specialist Master at Deloitte Consulting. I left IBM because I was hired in at too low of a level and was not instructed on the banding system and how many years of experience is applicable for each. We I tried to get this adjusted, I was forced to start the laborious promotion track process. Sorry, I didn't want to wait 2 - 3 years to "prove" that I had earned the position that I should have been hired into in the first place! Bad job IBM HR!
    • Senior Analytics Performance Tester at SAS Institute. This question assumes IBM is trying to retain employees. It is obvious in the US that IBM is not trying to retain employees. IBM is very clearly trying to reduce head count and is happy when random people leave due to no raises or depressing working conditions because each one is one less person that will receive a pay out cost in the next resource action (RA). Lack of cost of living salary increases for many years puts IBM employees far below what they can earn at a similar position at other companies, at least in the US. This is very obvious for those of us who have bothered to look elsewhere or have already jumped ship.

      I have no animosity towards IBM. I want them to do well. The best way I could help the big picture was to leave. My IBM stock will be worth more the more people leave. That is all the executives care about and it is true, so I think they are doing the right thing to let the company contract for a while... Please stop asking this question of how to retain employees. It is like a politician lie hiding what the real goals are at a high level. The goal is to reduce costs rapidly to make the ratio look good for 2015 road map. All other goals are 2ndary or even 3rdary if that is a word...

    • Sr. Data Architect at TeleCommunication Systems. Cost of living raises would help. My experience goes along with Richard. 12 years, 4 raises, not a single one even covered the increased cost of health care. More important, perhaps, is training managers. I've heard that there is a program that new managers go through, but it must be useless. So many have no clue how to handle people. Nor do they understand the difference between leadership and management. They have to do both.
    • Frankly, I'm at the point where I'd welcome a buyout. I'm never going to be promoted, nor would I want to be. I'm currently training my replacement in China. Lacking another choice, I'll hang in until I can afford to retire, and IBM will get its full value, but my focus is on my clients, not on IBM's direction. And they are definitely not matched.
    • Information Development, zSecure Suite at IBM Software Group. Seriously, I have the impression that IBM is not interested in keeping its employees. Any employee wanting to leave is one less to fire later on. Nobody says so in hard words, but as somebody else said on another discussion, IBM's objective seems to be to reduce its workforce in EMEA.
    • Preferred Network and Wireless contractor at Nielsen IT Consulting Inc. I spent 28 years at IBM and I can say that the company is so far removed from even ten years ago they will never regain the respect of the employee's. At some point in the future IBM might realize that it was the strength and dedication of its employees that made it great. Now management thinks it can continue with a staff of part time and temporary employees, who they will under pay and overwork.

      If you want dedicated employees you must respect them for what they are and not treat them like inventory to be kicked around.

      The bottom line is until the share holders figure this out and the stock price falls no change at the employee level will ever happen and when IBM falls everybody will loose and there won't be any dedicated employees to save the day.

    • Drop its unfair & overly restrictive 'performance' related compensation culture. It rewards less than 5% of those who are frequently just in the right place at the right time rather than the genuine high performers. For the rest it just encourages them to keep their heads down so they don't get noticed when managers are looking for someone to put at the bottom of their gradings. If everyone is doing a good job they should all benefit.

      Performance related schemes have been shown to have the opposite effect to that desired across virtually every company that has tried it.

    • (Retired - IBM - 2013) Major Incident Manager. What fascinates me about this topic, and the ensuing conversation, is that the answer to the question is already well known, and has been since the early 1950's, if not longer. As a matter of fact, through the mid 1990's, the question would virtually never have even been asked.

      Look back at how IBM related to its employees and at the same time how the employees related to the corporation. There was, I believe a common sense of working together, of sacrifice made from both ends, in order to maximize the success of both the corporation and the employees. There was a strong safety net in place to support the employee; the employee in turn would bend over backwards to keep that safety net in place; it was a win-win for both the in-the-company (and not to mention the third stakeholder, the stockholder).

      There was never any asking the question "What can IBM do to retain its employees, especially the recent hires". The answer was already known, it was practiced day in and day out, it was not just the culture but the DNA of the company.

      Thomas J. Watson's book "Father, Son, and Company" would be a good place to begin reading about some of this. I recommend it.

    • Certified IT Leader with 18+ Years Experience | Enterprise Architecture | SDLC | ITIL | Agile | Infrastructure & DevOps. Employee retention isn't part of the 2015 Roadmap (i.e. Roadkill). When you have very little top line growth, the only things left are massive cost reductions and stock buybacks to meet the $20 EPS.
    • Certified IT Leader with 18+ Years Experience | Enterprise Architecture | SDLC | ITIL | Agile | Infrastructure & DevOps. IBM and the Titanic have a lot of similarities. It takes a very long time to turn the ship. And it takes a very long time to even see any results of business decisions too. By the time things are obviously bad, it will be too late to save the ship from sinking. When massive cost cuts and stock buy backs are the only way to reach EPS goals, the future looks pretty grim.

      I fear IBM has already hit the iceberg but the passengers are mostly unaware. The crew (i.e. employees) are fearful. The passengers (i.e. stockholders) are calmly eating their sirloin steak dinner...since fillet mignon is no longer on the menu...but the ship is already sinking and there are only enough life boats and vests for the executives.

    • Executive Project Manager at IBM Global Services. IBM wants to retain employees? Wow! Could have fooled me given the continuing resource actions. Any employee who is smart enough to be courted as a "top contributor" is smart enough to read the tea leaves and knows (s)he could be on the next RA list and will get out before that happens—usually with a substantial raise with their new company.
    • BI & Enterprise Reporting Architect. There are lots of issues with firm like IBM who do consulting work. Travel is one and the people I worked with where hardly ever home with their families (so much for work/life balance. Another factor in my leaving was very small bonus payouts each year. As I said to my director "I had to be home when the cheque arrived as it was too little to go to the bank by itself". So I took an industry job, with better benefits, 20% pay hike, and a REAL bonus cheque and they don't want me to travel! Thank you IBM for pissing me off enough to find a better job and have a chance of a family life again.
    • Test Engineer at IBM Semiconductor Research and Development Center. The answer to this initial question is quite simple. IBM does not want to retain their employees. The Future Plans are to reduce its global workforce to just 100k people. They will do this by doing the following. First, IBM's near term plan within the next 3 years is to get out of the hardware business. It is very clear they are divesting in this area. Just look at their manufacturing facilities which are rotting to the very core with no intention of maintaining or expanding them. Their presence in hardware will only be at the research and development level while they sign more alliances and out source production to their partners.

      Second, IBM will also reduce their workforce in the SW and Services industry by heavily leveraging automation and advanced IT solutions.

      Lastly; IBM can continue to service their current customers and new customers remotely from any country in the world. So, they will also follow to lowest cost.

      It's pretty clear that IBM is now becoming a pure financial analysis and investment company that is only interested in providing the maximum gain to their stockholders, executives, and board members. Unfortunately, this will be their demise as only innovation breeds successful businesses today. IBM has lost sight that it's only people that can innovate, not machines. Machines can only replicate what people create. So, their is a new generation with a new game and a new set or rules in town.

      Companies like Google, Amazon, Facebook, Netflix, Yahoo, Apple, Samsung, and many more to some that will dominate the IT industry through " INNOVATION ". Again, more than ever, a successful company's most valuable resource has always been its people. Today, this is even more important.

      It's way too late for IBM to "reinvent itself". The pace of change has quickened and it's too late to catch up. So everyone should stop fantasizing that somehow IBM can now change direction. They are about 2-3 years too late!

    • Unified Communications Architect at Polycom. For what its worth, here are the main reasons I decided to leave IBM 2 years ago:
      1. No Loyalty: I received a 1 rating for 6 of the 8 full years I worked at IBM and felt fairly compensated. However, IBM management only seemed to care about their 2015 EPS plan and it didn't seem to matter if we made four billion dollars profit in a quarter; if you were in the wrong group at the wrong time, you could easily be terminated. The idea that there was little correlation between profitability and employee retention was very disconcerting.
      2. Bureaucracy and Poor Execution: Bureaucracy and a matrixed organization structure made IBM ineffective and employees/managers unaccountable. For the last couple years, I continued to lose confidence in the company's ability to execute and would always ask whether Google would do things this way. The answer was always "never".
      3. Bean Counters: There are many examples, but one that continued to resonate with me was the idea that a company like IBM didn't provide free coffee to its employees. It says a lot about management philosophy and the types of people who are in charge of making decisions. I worked from home and so this had no financial impact on me, but failing to offer such a minor perk that arguably helped productivity was hard to understand.

      I still work closely with IBM and continually see them plagued by the same problems. It is so frustrating, but maybe this is inherent to any 300,000+ person company. Ironically, I still feel loyalty and feel like I am more effective in helping them compete by working outside the company.

    • Account Executive at CSC. The clients are speaking. I can't remember in my 15 years at IBM the number of clients that are leaving IBM but it has become a huge problem in the past 2 years. We are losing some of our best clients. The recognize that IBM is no longer the company it once was. You can see by the revenue numbers at IBM that clients are leaving IBM at an alarming rate.

      Employees are being laid off in the USA also to have their jobs moved to other regions. I think that IBM will have trouble keeping new hires because it will only take a few years before they see what they are in for in the long haul.

      I think the days of staying with IBM for 30 years is over. There will be some but for the most part, most will only say 5-7 years as IBM HR has predicted. All the retirement policies are geared around the 5-7 year mark. IBM has made it clear, they don't want long term employees. Just my two cents.

    • Staff Software Engineer at IBM. IBM needs to rethink the way promotions are done. Waiting an average of 5 years before the first promotion is outrageous when you compare the promotion schedule with other large technology companies. It is extremely frustrating to be performing at a MUCH higher level than you were at day one, but on your 5 year anniversary you still haven't been promoted. Titles are cheap!
    • Senior Consultant, Instructor, and Course Developer: Data Analysis and Results, Inc. Agree entirely with this sentiment, and with so many of the sentiments in this very long thread—it's existed almost two years.

      Giving tiny token raises at best...and giving them once or twice in ten years or so appears to be the current IBM norm. This default behavior for the considerable majority is guaranteed to plant seeds of profound discontent. Sticking with the party line that "IBM pays for performance" is far worse, as this sets management formally against employees, essentially implying, "you got no raise because you are not good enough, or are substandard." Now, the manager is in a place of constant criticism of the employee—essentially making the case year round to justify the end of year result of, "no raise for you, just like the last xx years..."

      IBM does a LOT to convince itself that salaries are competitive. It's just not so. An educated IT professional can find and interpret salary data for their field/job function as readily as HR can. For much of the last five-seven years or so, IBM has had to do some pretty fair spin to make their assertion match statistical reality. In the end, it's an argument about industry average" — where there is nothing like average industry skill or workload in IBM. As a PM, I daily operated at a skill set vastly beyond what the average PM would even understand, let alone operate effectively at; my PM peers all did the same. I was simply never close to a reasonable wage for the seniority of the work. Again, this was not just me: almost everyone I knew...and I knew many dozens of people after 17 years, could say the same about every point I have stated here.

      The whole compensation thing is so important to showing appreciation, and to rebuilding a healthy dynamic between management and contributors again. You simply cannot keep chiseling down people's salaries relative to changes in the cost of living, year after year, and add insult to injury by keeping a management culture of blame and criticism for the employee's "yet again a 2 review...no raise for you" position. The toxicity just builds up, not only on a one-to-one relationship between manager and employee, but across the team, and surrounding organization.

      (If management really still thinks that *vast* numbers of employees do not talk extensively about salaries, about how many years since their last raise, the size of those raises, and the criticism used to justify any given employee's "2" rating...well, that's just painfully naive. Such management behavior, widespread, over time, impacting a vast majority...of course people talk freely! That's just human nature.)

      Sadly, I expect nothing will change. IBM resolved all the employee survey criticisms about workload, grueling schedule, and no raises in years when IBM was obscenely profitable by getting rid of the surveys. They will resolve the current level of issues by getting rid of the employees that complain too much—and the cycle will continue.

    • Business Development Manager at Neptune Innovations - Sales Drives the Business. I cannot comment on why they new hires are leaving but I can contribute why millennials are leaving.
      • Illogical sales plans—they punish you for doing well by raising your quote to unattainable levels.
      • Favoritism—people get preferential treatment based on who they know, not how well they do.
      • Inflexibility—most Millenials would rather do their job from a couch than sit in an office to look busy for 8 hours.
      • Lack of vertical promotion—"there needs to be back fill" and with more people quitting because they are not getting promotions there never is.
      • Put your time in—notion that you need to work longer not more effectively resonates poorly with Millenials.
      • Lack of rewards—hitting sales plan used to be a big deal "100% club"; now you get a pin.

      I, much like many posters here recently left. I am thankful for the training I got there, the skills I learned as it prepared me for my next opportunity. I was always a top contributor on my team and even on my last day was helping a colleague close a deal and my manager put together a loss report. The draw to learn new skills and challenge myself was too strong, I could not keep doing what I was doing any longer.

    • Vice President at Horizon Screening. I left IBM about 10 years ago, and had been there almost 10 years, so my opinion may be a bit dated, but I will say that when I started we had the opportunity to take classes, earn bonuses, trips, etc, and had the sense that the opportunities to move up or into more desirable jobs was there. When I left we were not able to take classes, bonuses were nearly non-existent, and my managers had prevented me from interviewing for positions outside my organization because of the fear they would not be able to backfill my position.

      I got the feeling that if I wanted to move to sales or Global Services that the door would have been open, but I had no interest, so I was stuck moving up in an organization I was not interested in, and that offered limited earning potential and few opportunities to use the gifts I felt I had to offer.

      I appreciate every minute I worked at IBM, and I wear the "Former IBM'er" tag with pride, but I hope that those doors of opportunity will open again for young people who are joining the IBM team.

    • President at John Pitcher Consulting A couple of observations. I have the benefit of having been at IBM for many of the changes that formed today's IBM. There was, at the beginning of my stay, a culture of 'do the right thing and the numbers will take care of themselves'. People all worked for the betterment of the company and focused less on their personal measurements. That included executives right up to the top.

      There were business model changes. There was also mismanagement from the top down. The focus became pure business school based numbers management. There was lip service to the previous culture, but there was also a marked turn in senior management attitude toward employees. There was talk of employees feeling entitled and of employees having to 'raise the bar' on their performance. The relationship became more adversarial than collaborative.

      At the same time, senior executives chose to raise the boundary of delegation vertically in the organization, undermining first, second, and third line management's ability to manage employees other than mechanically within the system. So, we now have a 'place to work' attitude with employees instead of a 'member of the company' attitude. I can't think of a single manager in the last 15 years who could, off the top of their head, explain to an employee (without a high BS quotient) how their job contributed to the well-being of IBM.

      If an employee doesn't feel like a contributing member of a company and doesn't have a clear understanding of how their work contributes to the company every day, they will only stay as long as they are learning new things and being engaged by the technical work. When that stops they leave.

    • Executive Project Manager at IBM Global Services. Metrics such as Utilization usually have no bearing on who is RA'd. I managed people who had over 100% utilization who I had to let go. Then, with a history of PBC ratings of 1 or 2+ for the previous 5 years, I was RA'd. There isn't any rhyme or reason to who is dispatched, it is just a numbers game—one body is as good as another.
    • Strategist. Economist. Keynote Speaker. Writer. I was part of a group of 5-6 experienced hires for strategy consulting. I lasted the longest, resigning when I hit my one-year mark. IBM needs to utilize its talent and only hire when it has the work it promised it hires. We were all very talented. Who wants to waste another year doing proposals that went no where as we were selling to the wrong person and way to late in the right target's buying cycle. I miss the people at IBM very much. As to IBM, not one bit. The "smarter planet" company is in my book not very smart given the talent drains I observed and the non-stop fight for a piece of the action among the partners.
  • Washington Post:

    Why more companies want pensions off their books. By Michael A. Fletcher. Excerpts: Verizon has done it. General Motors has done it. And so have Ford and, recently, ketchup kingpin Heinz.

    These brand-name companies have all moved part of their pension obligations off their books and into annuities run by insurance companies.

    The move, called de-risking, requires companies to pay a lump sum to purchase a group annuity from an insurance company. The insurer then takes over the retirement payments, wiping troubling and erratic pension obligations off the books of the purchaser. ...

    Now that the stock market is roaring and interest rates are expected to increase, buying annuities to get rid of pension obligations is becoming less expensive. That means interest in de-risking is rising. A recent survey of 182 companies by Prudential found that 53 percent of them have either transferred defined benefit pension liabilities to a third-party insurer or “are likely to” in the next two years. That is a sharp increase from a 2010 survey. ...

    The Pension Rights Center, which pushes for better retirement security, worries that converting pensions to insurance annuities could open retirees up to new problems. Often, when a company transfers a pension to an annuity it also offers retirees the option of a lump-sum buyout, a move that is cheaper for companies than buying an annuity.

    Those buyouts are often attractive to retirees who can get their hands on as much as hundreds of thousands of dollars at once, but few are prepared to invest the money in a way that will make it last a lifetime. Advocates also worry that annuities are not backed by a federal agency such as the Pension Benefits Guaranty Corp., which insures private pensions. In comparison, annuities are backed by state associations.

  • Alliance for Retired Americans Friday Alert. This week's topics include:
    • House Budget Committee Chairman Paul Ryan Releases Anti-Poverty Proposal
    • Medicare Pilot Program Scraps Hospital Stay Requirement for Skilled Nursing Care
    • Members of Congress Form Medicaid Expansion Caucus
    • Senate Committee Examines Social Security Disability Insurance
    • Next Week: Social Security and Medicare Trustees Report, Medicare’s 49th Birthday
    • Vote for Illinois Alliance Member Katie Jordan as Your Hero
    • California Alliance Member Charlie Williams Passes Away
    • Fiesta Attends APWU Retirees Conference
New on the Alliance@IBM Site

Job Cut Reports

  • Comment 07/26/14:

    My area is again actively replacing US-based workers with people based in other countries. One contractor was let go this past week, another person will be let go next week. Both IBM employees and contractors are under consideration. Management is being pressured to get US workers off the books, regardless of the impact to the customers they are supporting. -still_suffering-
  • Comment 07/26/14:

    IBM management is not only sexist about women in the workplace , but they also have a history of discrimination against women and workers over 55. They are the worst company to work for when it comes to discrimination due to age and sex. IBM US employees need a union to protect this type of discrimination in the workplace. IBM H/R is useless when it comes to discrimination. Join the union. -Join the Union-

IBM Retiree Issues Comments

If you hire good people and treat them well, they will try to do a good job. They will stimulate one another by their vigor and example. They will set a fast pace for themselves. Then if they are well led and occasionally inspired, if they understand what the company is trying to do and know they will share in its sucess, they will contribute in a major way. The customer will get the superior service he is looking for. The result is profit to customers, employees, and to stcckholders. —Thomas J. Watson, Jr., from A Business and Its Beliefs: The Ideas That Helped Build IBM.

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