Welcome to IBM Employee News and Links

“News and links for IBM employees, retirees, ex-employees, and persons interested in pension, retirement, off-shoring and corporate governance issues”—The news you won't see on W3!

Our Friends:

Alliance@IBM Rocky Mountain Action Coalition U.K IBM Members

Quick Links:

Get involved! Insider trading After IBM Lenovo Employee Discount

Previous highlights:

July 4, 2015 June 27, 2015 June 20, 2015 June 13, 2015 June 6, 2015 May 30, 2015 May 23, 2015 May 16, 2015 May 9, 2015 May 2, 2015 April 25, 2015 April 18, 2015 April 11, 2015 April 4, 2015 March 28, 2015 March 21, 2015 March 14, 2015 March 7, 2015 February 28, 2015 February 21, 2015 February 14, 2015 February 7, 2015 January 31, 2015 January 24, 2015 January 17, 2015 January 10, 2015 January 3, 2015 December 27, 2014 December 20, 2014 December 13, 2014 December 6, 2014 November 29, 2014 November 22, 2014 November 15, 2014 November 8, 2014 November 1, 2014 October 25, 2014 October 18, 2014 October 11, 2014 October 4, 2014 September 27, 2014 September 13, 2014 September 6, 2014 August 30, 2014 August 23, 2014 August 16, 2014 August 9, 2014 August 2, 2014 July 26, 2014 July 19, 2014 July 12, 2014 July 5, 2014 June 28, 2014 June 21, 2014 June 14, 2014 June 7, 2014 May 31, 2014 May 24, 2014 May 17, 2014 May 10, 2014 May 3, 2014 April 26, 2014 April 19, 2014 April 12, 2014 April 5, 2014 March 29, 2014 March 22, 2014 March 15, 2014 March 8, 2014 March 1, 2014 February 22, 2014 February 15, 2014 February 8, 2014 February 1, 2014 January 25, 2014 January 18, 2014 January 11, 2014 January 4, 2014 December 28, 2013 December 21, 2013 December 14, 2013 December 7, 2013 November 30, 2013 November 23, 2013 November 16, 2013 November 9, 2013 November 2, 2013 October 26, 2013 October 19, 2013 October 12, 2013 October 5, 2013 September 28, 2013 September 21, 2013 September 14, 2013 September 7, 2013 August 31, 2013 August 24, 2013 August 17, 2013 August 10, 2013 August 3, 2013 July 27, 2013 July 20, 2013 July 13, 2013 July 6, 2013 June 29, 2013 June 22, 2013 June 15, 2013 June 8, 2013 June 1, 2013 May 25, 2013 May 18, 2013 May 11, 2013 May 4, 2013 April 27, 2013 April 20, 2013 April 13, 2013 April 6, 2013 March 30, 2013 March 23, 2013 March 16, 2013 March 9, 2013 March 2, 2013 February 23, 2013 February 16, 2013 February 9, 2013 February 2, 2013 January 26, 2013 January 19, 2013 January 12, 2013 January 5, 2013 December 29, 2012 December 22, 2012 December 15, 2012 December 8, 2012 December 1, 2012 November 24, 2012 November 17, 2012 November 10, 2012 November 3, 2012 October 27, 2012 October 20, 2012 October 13, 2012 October 6, 2012 September 29, 2012 September 22, 2012 September 15, 2012 September 8, 2012 September 1, 2012 August 25, 2012 August 18, 2012 August 11, 2012 August 4, 2012 July 28, 2012 July 21, 2012 July 14, 2012 July 7, 2012 June 30, 2012 June 23, 2012 June 16, 2012 June 9, 2012 June 2, 2012 May 26, 2012 May 19, 2012 May 12, 2012 May 5, 2012 April 28, 2012 April 21, 2012 April 14, 2012 April 7, 2012 March 31, 2012 March 24, 2012 March 17, 2012 March 10, 2012 March 3, 2012 February 25, 2012 February 18, 2012 February 11, 2012 February 4, 2012 January 28, 2012 January 21, 2012 January 14, 2012 January 7, 2012 December 31, 2011 December 24, 2011 December 17, 2011 December 10, 2011 December 3, 2011 November 26, 2011 November 19, 2011 November 12, 2011 November 5, 2011 October 29, 2011 October 22, 2011 October 15, 2011 October 8, 2011 October 1, 2011 September 24, 2011 September 17, 2011 September 10, 2011 September 3, 2011 August 27, 2011 August 20, 2011 August 13, 2011 August 6, 2011 July 30, 2011 July 23, 2011 July 16, 2011 July 9, 2011 July 2, 2011 June 25, 2011 June 18, 2011 June 11, 2011 June 4, 2011 May 28, 2011 May 21, 2011 May 14, 2011 May 7, 2011 April 30, 2011 April 23, 2011 April 16, 2011 April 9, 2011 April 2, 2011 March 26, 2011 March 19, 2011 March 12, 2011 March 5, 2011 February 26, 2011 February 19, 2011 February 12, 2011 February 5, 2011 January 29, 2011 January 22, 2011 January 15, 2011 January 8, 2011 January 1, 2011 December 25, 2010 December 18, 2010 December 11, 2010 December 4, 2010 November 27, 2010 November 20, 2010 November 13, 2010 November 6, 2010 October 30, 2010 October 23, 2010 October 16, 2010 October 9, 2010 October 2, 2010 September 25, 2010 September 18, 2010 September 11, 2010 September 4, 2010 August 28, 2010 August 21, 2010 August 14, 2010 August 7, 2010 July 31, 2010 July 24, 2010 July 17, 2010 July 10, 2010 July 3, 2010 June 26, 2010 June 19, 2010 June 12, 2010 June 5, 2010 May 29, 2010 May 22, 2010 May 15, 2010 May 8, 2010 May 1, 2010 April 24, 2010 April 17, 2010 April 10, 2010 April 3, 2010 March 27, 2010 March 20, 2010 March 13, 2010 March 6, 2010 February 27, 2010 February 20, 2010 February 13, 2010 February 6, 2010 January 30, 2010 January 23, 2010 January 16, 2010 January 9, 2010 January 2, 2010 December 26, 2009 December 19, 2009 December 12, 2009 December 5, 2009 November 28, 2009 November 21, 2009 November 14, 2009 November 7, 2009 October 31, 2009 October 24, 2009 October 17, 2009 October 10, 2009 October 3, 2009 September 26, 2009 September 19, 2009 September 12, 2009 September 5, 2009 August 29, 2009 August 22, 2009 August 15, 2009 August 8, 2009 August 1, 2009 July 25, 2009 July 18, 2009 July 11, 2009 July 4, 2009 June 27, 2009 June 20, 2009 June 13, 2009 June 6, 2009 May 30, 2009 May 23, 2009 May 16, 2009 May 9, 2009 May 2, 2009 April 25, 2009 April 18, 2009 April 11, 2009 April 4, 2009 March 28, 2009 March 21, 2009 March 14, 2009 March 7, 2009 February 28, 2009 February 21, 2009 February 14, 2009 February 7, 2009 January 31, 2009 January 24, 2009 January 17, 2009 January 10, 2009 January 03, 2009 December 27, 2008 December 20, 2008 December 13, 2008 December 6, 2008 November 29, 2008 November 22, 2008 November 15, 2008 November 8, 2008 November 1, 2008 October 25, 2008 October 18, 2008 October 11, 2008 October 4, 2008 September 27, 2008 September 20, 2008 September 13, 2008 September 6, 2008 August 30, 2008 August 23, 2008 August 16, 2008 August 9, 2008 August 2, 2008 July 26, 2008 July 19, 2008 July 12, 2008 July 5, 2008 June 28, 2008 June 21, 2008 June 14, 2008 June 7, 2008 May 31, 2008 May 24, 2008 May 17, 2008 May 10, 2008 2008 Stock Meeting April 26, 2008 April 19, 2008 April 12, 2008 April 5, 2008 March 29, 2008 March 22, 2008 March 15, 2008 March 8, 2008 March 1, 2008 February 16, 2008 February 9, 2008 February 2, 2008 January 26, 2008 January 19, 2008 January 12, 2008 January 5, 2008 December 29, 2007 December 22, 2007 December 15, 2007 December 8, 2007 December 1, 2007 November 24, 2007 November 17, 2007 November 10, 2007 November 3, 2007 October 27, 2007 October 20, 2007 October 13, 2007 October 6, 2007 September 29, 2007 September 22, 2007 September 15, 2007 September 8, 2007 September 1, 2007 August 25, 2007 August 18, 2007 August 11, 2007 August 4, 2007 July 28, 2007 July 21, 2007 July 14, 2007 July 7, 2007 June 30, 2007 June 23, 2007 June 16, 2007 June 9, 2007 June 2, 2007 May 26, 2007 May 19, 2007 May 12, 2007 May 5, 2007 2007 Stock Meeting April 21, 2007 April 14, 2007 April 7, 2007 March 31, 2007 March 24, 2007 March 17, 2007 March 10, 2007 March 3, 2007 February 24, 2007 February 17, 2007 February 10, 2007 February 3, 2007 January 27, 2007 January 20, 2007 January 13, 2007 January 6, 2007 December 30, 2006 December 23, 2006 December 16, 2006 December 9, 2006 December 2, 2006 November 25, 2006 November 18, 2006 November 11, 2006 November 4, 2006 October 28, 2006 October 21, 2006 October 14, 2006 October 7, 2006 September 30, 2006 September 23, 2006 September 16, 2006 September 9, 2006 September 2, 2006 August 26, 2006 August 19, 2006 August 12, 2006 August 5, 2006 July 29, 2006 July 22, 2006 July 15, 2006 July 8, 2006 July 1, 2006 June 24, 2006 June 17, 2006 June 10, 2006 June 3, 2006 May 27, 2006 May 20, 2006 May 13, 2006 May 6, 2006 2006 Stock Meeting April 22, 2006 April 15, 2006 April 8, 2006 April 1, 2006 March 25, 2006 March 18, 2006 March 11, 2006 March 4, 2006 February 25, 2006 February 18, 2006 February 11, 2006 February 4, 2006 January 28, 2006 January 21, 2006 January 14, 2006 January 7, 2006 December 31, 2005 December 24, 2005 December 17, 2005 December 10, 2005 December 03, 2005 November 26, 2005 November 19, 2005 November 12, 2005 November 5, 2005 October 29, 2005 October 22, 2005 October 15, 2005 October 8, 2005 October 1, 2005 September 24, 2005 September 17, 2005 September 10, 2005 September 3, 2005 August 27, 2005 August 20, 2005 August 13, 2005 August 6, 2005 July 30, 2005 July 23, 2005 July 16, 2005 July 9, 2005 July 2, 2005 June 25, 2005 June 18, 2005 June 11, 2005 June 4, 2005 May 28, 2005 May 21, 2005 May 14, 2005 May 7, 2005 April 30, 2005 April 23, 2005 April 16, 2005 April 9, 2005 April 2, 2005 March 26, 2005 March 19, 2005 March 12, 2005 March 5, 2005 February 26, 2005 February 19, 2005 February 12, 2005 February 5, 2005 January 29, 2005 January 22, 2005 January 15, 2005 January 8, 2005 January 1, 2005 December 25, 2004 December 18, 2004 December 11, 2004 December 4, 2004 November 27, 2004 November 20, 2004 November 13, 2004 November 6, 2004 October 30, 2004 October 23, 2004 October 16, 2004 October 9, 2004 October 2, 2004 September 25, 2004 September 18, 2004 September 11, 2004 September 4, 2004 August 28, 2004 August 21, 2004 August 14, 2004 August 7, 2004 July 31, 2004 July 24, 2004 July 17, 2004 July 10, 2004 July 3, 2004 June 26, 2004 June 19, 2004 June 5, 2004 May 29, 2004 May 22, 2004 May 15, 2004 May 8, 2004 2004 Stock Meeting April 24, 2004 April 10, 2004 April 3, 2004 March 27, 2004 March 20, 2004 March 13, 2004 March 6, 2004 February 28, 2004 February 21, 2004 February 14, 2004 February 7, 2004 February 1, 2004 January 18, 2004 December 27, 2003 December 20, 2003 December 13, 2003 December 6, 2003 November 29, 2003 November 22, 2003 November 15, 2003 November 8, 2003 November 1, 2003 October 25, 2003 October 18, 2003 October 11, 2003 October 4, 2003 September 27, 2003 September 20, 2003 September 13, 2003 September 6, 2003 August 30, 2003 August 23, 2003 August 16, 2003 August 9, 2003 Pension Lawsuit Win July 26, 2003 July 19, 2003 July 12, 2003 July 5, 2003 June 28, 2003 June 21, 2003 June 14, 2003 June 7, 2003 May 31, 2003 May 24, 2003 May 17, 2003 May 10, 2003 2003 Stock Meeting April 26, 2003 April 19, 2003 April 12, 2003 April 5, 2003 March 29, 2003 March 22, 2003 March 15, 2003 March 8, 2003 March 1, 2003 February 22, 2003 February 15, 2003 February 8, 2003 February 1, 2003 January 25, 2003 January 18, 2003 January 11, 2003 January 4, 2003 December 28, 2002 December 21, 2002 December 14, 2002 December 7, 2002 November 30, 2002 November 23, 2002 November 16, 2002 November 9, 2002 November 2, 2002 October 26, 2002 October 19, 2002 October 12, 2002 October 5, 2002 September 28, 2002 September 21, 2002 September 14, 2002 September 7, 2002 August 31, 2002 August 24, 2002 August 17, 2002 August 10, 2002 August 3, 2002 July 27, 2002 July 20, 2002 July 13, 2002 July 6, 2002 June 29, 2002 June 22, 2002 June 15, 2002 June 8, 2002 June 1, 2002 May 25, 2002 May 18, 2002 May 11, 2002 2002 Stock Meeting April 27, 2002 April 20, 2002 April 13, 2002 April 6, 2002 March 30, 2002 March 23, 2002 March 16, 2002 March 9, 2002 March 2, 2002 February 23, 2002 February 16, 2002 February 9, 2002 February 2, 2002 January 26, 2002 January 19, 2002 January 12, 2002 January 5, 2002 December 29, 2001 December 22, 2001 December 15, 2001 December 8, 2001 December 1, 2001 November 24, 2001 November 17, 2001 November 10, 2001 November 3, 2001 October 27, 2001 October 20, 2001 October 13, 2001 October 6, 2001 September 29, 2001 September 22, 2001 September 15, 2001 September 8, 2001 September 1, 2001 August 25, 2001 August 18, 2001 August 11, 2001 August 4, 2001 July 28, 2001 July 21, 2001 July 14, 2001 July 7, 2001 June 30, 2001 June 23, 2001 June 16, 2001 June 9, 2001 June 2, 2001 May 26, 2001 May 19, 2001 May 12, 2001 May 5, 2001 2001 Stock Meeting April 21, 2001 April 14, 2001 April 7, 2001 March 31, 2001 March 24, 2001 March 17, 2001 March 10, 2001 March 3, 2001 February 24, 2001 February 17, 2001 February 10, 2001 February 3, 2001 January 27, 2001 January 20, 2001 January 13, 2001 January 6, 2001 December 30, 2000 December 23, 2000 December 16, 2000 December 9, 2000 December 2, 2000 November 24, 2000 November 17, 2000 November 10, 2000 November 4, 2000 October 28, 2000 October 21, 2000 October 14, 2000 October 7, 2000 September 30, 2000 September 23, 2000 September 16, 2000 September 9, 2000 September 2, 2000 August 26, 2000 August 19, 2000 August 12, 2000 July 29, 2000 July 22, 2000 July 15, 2000 July 1, 2000 June 24, 2000 June 17, 2000 June 10, 2000 June 3, 2000 May 27, 2000 May 20, 2000 May 13, 2000 May 6, 2000 April, 2000

Join the Alliance!

Join your fellow employees who are fighting for your benefits—Join the Alliance!

Retirees, vendors, contractors, temps, and active employees are all eligible to become members of the Alliance@IBM

Highlights—July 4, 2015

  • Poughkeepsie Journal:

    It's Day One as GlobalFoundries for ex-IBM plant. By Craig Wolf, Poughkeepsie Journal, and Joseph Spector, Albany Bureau Chief. Excerpts: It's "orange is the new blue" for about 5,000 former IBMers who now work for GlobalFoundries either here or in Burlington, Vt.

    As newly transferred workers tried on the corporate color of their new employer and celebrated with parties at the plants, executives said that this company is one that is clearly focused on semiconductors and making chips for everything from smartphones to IBM's Corp.'s big computers.

    It was the other side of the coin that IBM had flipped. Big Blue has exited the chip-making business. But it continues to maintain research and design divisions that will work closely with GlobalFoundries, which has a 10-year deal to supply high-end chips to IBM. ...

    While not addressed in the conference, executives have previously said that future nodes of technology process will be developed at Malta. Under IBM, that work was done historically at East Fishkill and in Westchester County labs and in more recent times, in Albany. ...

    The closing end months of required regulatory approvals and will move an estimated 5,000 IBM workers — split between the East Fishkill, Dutchess County, and Burlington, Vt. plants — over to the payroll of GlobalFoundries. ...

    "What I've seen is pretty positive," said Earl Mongeon, a 36-year IBMer who works at the Burlington plant and has been outspoken in his concerns about Big Blue's path. He has been serving as vice president of the Alliance@IBM, a union-backed worker group, a post he's leaving since he'll no longer be an IBMer.

    The transferred workers are getting the same rate of pay as they did with IBM and the health benefits look better, he said. The out-of-pocket payments he's looking at are about half of what they are under IBM, he said, and, "The premiums are much lower."

    He said, "(GlobalFoundries) wants to run it as a business and wants to invest in it and keep it going." IBM, which was known to be planning an exit from the business, had trimmed back its investing and was experiencing difficulty hiring or keeping new recruits on board, he said, attributing that to uncertainty about IBM's future in the business.

  • The Register:

    IBM gets green light to sell off chips biz to GlobalFoundries. US regulators furrow brows, frown, nod. By Neil McAllister. Excerpts: IBM looks to be in the clear to sell off its ailing chippery division to GlobalFoundries after US regulators gave the deal the nod on Tuesday. GlobalFoundries was spun off from AMD in 2009 with substantial funding from the Advanced Technology Investment Company, a wholly owned investment vehicle of the government of Abu Dhabi, in the United Arab Emirates. ...

    Shareholders, however, have been less than pleased with IBM's handling of the deal. The City of Sterling Heights Police & Fire Retirement System, a Michigan-based pension fund, has sued IBM for allegedly inflating the value of the chipmaking division ahead of the sale, which the fund claims subsequently caused IBM's stock to tank.

  • EE Times:

    IBM-GlobalFoundries Deal Finalized. By Jessica Lipsky. Excerpts: Following final approval by U.S. regulators, IBM closed the sale of its chip manufacturing operations to GlobalFoundries. IBM will pay $1.5 billion to the world’s second largest chip foundry. ...

    IBM’s fabs had been losing significant money in recent years; it’s two primary fabs lost approximately $700 million during 2013 and 2014. IBM’s East Fishkill, N.Y., fab that made about 15,000 wafers a month mainly in 45 and 32 nm silicon-on-insulator processes. The fab is also ramping the 22 nm process used to make IBM’s Power 8 processors and has some 14 nm technology in development for the follow-on generation.

    The Burlington, Vt., fab which makes 45,000 200 mm wafers per month. The fab uses a wide variety of processes, including a 130/180 nm RF SOI process for RF front-ends and switches used mainly in cellphones and a 90 nm silicon germanium process, mainly for power chips used across a wide range of high-end applications including car radars and high-frequency radios and testers.

    Selected reader comments:

    • Just who paid who?

      DMcCunney. I'm missing something. IBM is selling its fabs to GlobalFoundries, yet IBM is paying GlobalFoundries $1.5 billion? Usually, when you sell something to someone, they pay you.
    • Re: Just who paid who?

      You read this right. IBM is indeed paying Globalfoundries to take over the fabs. It must be better for them than incurring further losses.
  • Glassdoor IBM reviews. Selected reviews follow:
    • “OK Place To Work”

      Current Employee — Software Engineer in Columbus, OH. I have been working at IBM full-time (more than 10 years).

      Pros: The pros are having a job to go to every day. There are so many nice people working there and they help whenever they can. Employees are encouraged to participate in a lot of community involvement and diversity is respected.

      Cons: No pay raises ever and they tend to pay under the national and local averages. Promotions are promised but never come to pass no matter how hard you work or how much of your life you devote to your job. You have to be in the right clique at the right time. Managers are not given head count to meet the growing demands of the business.

      Advice to Management: Pay more attention to your employees and recognize them for the hard work they do.

    • “Technician”

      Former Employee — Technician in East Fishkill, NY. I worked at IBM full-time (more than 10 years). Pros: Free parking and no whips. Cons: Nepotism, racism, age discrimination and not honest. Advice to Management: Get rid of the fake PBC.
    • “Technology is an anachronism here”

      Current Employee — Program Manager (Like Everyone Else) in Raleigh, NC. I have been working at IBM full-time (more than 10 years).

      Pros: Slow ponderous processes that micro micro manage everything. Why is a good thing? Because given their near pathological hatred of their own workforce, their own internal processes make it difficult to actually fire people. So you get a grace period before they do so you can get a better job.

      Cons: Technology and the people who do it died years ago. This is a company run by and for lawyers and financial risk managers. There's little actual computer 'stuff' going on. And what there is is shift based grunt work. No matter who you are if you're not a manager you will be on call, for something. And you will be required to work those nights and weekends. And you will be expected to work on your 'days off'. And if you handle any sort of operational task for customers, because staffing, for all its bloat is quite thin, you will be required to put in 80 hr weeks.

      When I started 20 years ago I was 5 levels from the CEO. Today I am at the same job level as before and I am 14 levels from the CEO. IBM run by middle managers whose sole job is to compile the status of the the status of status reporting reporting reporting. And woe to he or she who afoul of one of the thousands of attorneys. You will get fired or wish you hand been.

      Advice to Management: You won't listen so there's point in bothering to suggest anything. Hell you'd probably sue me for lifting my head from the ground to dare to speak to you at all. My best advice would be to fire the top 12 layers of management.

    • “Bell curve ranking”

      Former Employee — Technical Sales in Hursley, England (UK). I worked at IBM full-time (more than 10 years). Pros: Plenty of options, lots of products and always something new happening. Cons: Managers have a 10 to 15 percent failure ranking to give out each year. So you will receive a PBC 3 if you are there a while. If you get a 3 at the end of year ranking then all sorts of hell awaits. Advice to Management: Scrap mass ranking.
    • “Not really a technology company”

      Former Employee — Anonymous Employee. I worked at IBM full-time (more than a year).

      Pros: Massive presence and brand, top notch telecommuting environment for individuals who qualify. Touch many areas and industries.

      Cons: I think they invented bureaucracy, or at least perfected it. HR is a an offshore call center, I once hung up after being told the average wait time was 2 hours. At IBM you are literally a number. Most of of the company seems obsessed with "growing" through squeezing customers and tightening margins, not much technological innovation for such a powerful company with a proud history.

      Advice to Management: Return to technology and stop letting the accounting department chart the future. Fire any purely overhead employee who has been with the company more that 10 years, they are gaming the company. Listen to customers, because many dislike IBM and only remain because they feel stuck.

    • “Overrated and under promised”

      Former Employee — Senior Consultant in London, England (UK). I worked at IBM full-time (more than 3 years).

      Pros:

      • The IBM brand (Global Business Services GBS) on your CV opens a wealth of opportunities
      • Client-facing experience
      • Good benefits
      • Handful of great people to work with
      • Better place for graduates

      Cons:

      • Extremely low pay for experience hires, not a place for experience hires
      • Not a company that looks after their staff
      • Utilisation is extremely high 85%, which effectively means there is no work life balance
      • Ego driven consultants and heavily driven by layers of management
      • Promotion process is long and tiring. Everything is driven by your band, not your capabilities or skill set
      • 100% travel and client based
      • Negative culture
      • Internal politics and bullying but HR does not care to resolve.

      Advice to Management: Listen to your staff and start to care. Ego only gets you so far; there are talented people in IBM. It's a shame that there are far more players and talkers than actual doers. Leadership isn't also about making profit or the position you are at. It's about building the next wave of leaders and helping those talented individual succeed.

    • “Project Executive”

      Current Employee — Anonymous Employee in Denver, CO. I have been working at IBM full-time (more than a year). Pros: The ability to control your account is nice. We do everything. Good reputation in the industry. Cons: Can be very difficult to work quickly. A lot of people take the view point of this is not my job therefore not my problem. Advice to Management: You must fix the culture. Things move way too slow for the worlds new pace of business. IBM purchased a cloud company that is not equipped to handle enterprise customers yet, who are the lions share of our revenue.
    • “Mixed bag.”

      Former Employee — Staff Software Engineer in Boulder, CO. I worked at IBM full-time (more than 10 years). Pros: Variety of experience. Feeling of being in an important place. Cons: Annual third-quarter layoffs or furloughs. Process placed ahead of productivity. Advice to Management: Stop trying to placate Wall Street and sell product. If you make and sell a good product at a competitive price you will gain market share. The byzantine structure for business partners and customer support is frustrating for everyone involved. You need to shed about 4-6 layers of middle management. You must promote a culture that innovates, not stagnates in process documents.
    • “IBM used to be a great company to work for, now it's just a job”

      Current Employee — SSR — Support Services Representative in Phoenix, AZ. I have been working at IBM full-time (more than 10 years). Pros: I have worked with some great people, unfortunately they have pretty much all been RA'd or retired. My pay check has never bounded .LOL. Cons: Management used to understand the stress and challenges of the job but most have been promoted from other areas and hence don't understand. They want to make a sales force out of all the technical employees. Don't they understand that we are all wired different? HW support used to be top notch, however they have fallen out of sorts by RA'ing the good employees and off-shoring of jobs. Haven't had a raise in years. Local IBM let a good tech walk because they didn't want to spend 1/2 of what they have spent training his replacement. Advice to Management: Stop trying to put round pegs in square holes.
    • “Great Innovation Culture...But In Trouble”

      Current Employee — Engineer in Essex, VT.

      Pros:

      • There are no smarter people than IBMers.
      • The diversity is real and most appreciated.
      • Coworkers are awesome...IBMers are special people.
      • Concern for the community is great...lots of outreach opportunities.

      Cons:

      • IBM is in trouble at the moment. It needs to learn how to act a lot faster, and has tons of catch-up work to do to get to the level of a Google or Apple in speed of execution and delivering innovation to the marketplace. This could be an opportunity for people looking for that challenge.
      • There are a lot of well paid people in IBM that don't really understand how the work is done. This slows down the delivery of new innovation and make setting clear realistic goals difficult. Hoping leaders realize Agile applies to them first, but I'm not seeing much sign of this beyond a few videos.

      Advice to Management: I like the focus on Agile, but you need to follow the old saying....you can't think you're way to a new way of acting, you need to act your way to a new way of thinking. For Agile to be successful, top management needs to change the way they work. Daily cycles, and going to where the work is done instead of asking it to come to you (which is what you do when you schedule meetings in your conference room...try going to the daily scrum meetings instead...you'll learn a lot more and feel like you're part of the team.

    • “15 Years with Big Blue”

      Former Employee — Procurement Cost Manager in Jacksonville, FL. I worked at IBM (more than 10 years). Pros: Good salary and benefits. Progressive HR policies. Good work-life balance. Ability to work at home. Cons: Huge organization. Slow to turnaround. Corporate bureaucracy. But when you get into your late 50s, you better watch your back and be prepared to either jump ship or be thrown overboard.
    • “Sadly just a shell of its former greatness”

      Former Employee — TSM in Zürich (Switzerland).

      Pros: After 15 years living and breathing IBM, I learned A LOT about enterprise IT. I had a chance to do big things, work with great customers, tread new territory in the outsourcing market. I met some brilliant people, made some life long friends.

      Cons: They are asset stripping themselves on purpose. Managers who have been with the company over 20 years will tell you they also hate what it has become. Cold hard steel. I left before I made it to the RA stack for an excellent job 2 levels up at 30% more pay. What this should tell you is a lack of fair compensation or promotions for many years along with ridiculous policies and overhead has made this company a dying behemoth.

      Advice to Management: Replace Ginny. Take better care of your people. Focus on how to grow revenue, not cut cost.

    • “It used to be a good company.”

      Former Employee—Anonymous Employee. I worked at IBM full-time (more than 10 years).

      Pros:

      • Different job opportunities within the company.
      • A lot of free education.
      • Work from home (in some positions).
      • Benefits are okay but decreasing.

      Cons:

      • Top down management with an incredible amount of layers from top to bottom.
      • Focused on bottom line and since they're not able to increase revenue, cost-cutting and layoffs are daily news.
      • Morale is decreasing.
      • The many administrative processes implemented slows down productivity.
      • The performance evaluation system is worthless and demoralizing. It's basically used to ensure that the majority of employees cannot get a raise.
      • You may be lucky to have a manager that cares about your career or you may not.
      • You're just another resource that can be exploited or discarded regardless of what you bring to the table.

      Advice to Management: Ginny who? Better communication would be a big plus. Twelve straight quarters with missed revenue targets. Maybe it's time to make some changes at the top.

    • “System Administrator”

      Former Employee — Anonymous Employee in Chicago, IL. I worked at IBM (more than 8 years). Pros: Good start for college graduates and non-IT people to get into the IT industry. After a year, you can move on to a better paying IT position. Cons: No work/life balance. Layoffs. Poorly trained first line managers. Inconsistent policies. Company policies are inconsistent department to department. IBM added "manager discretion" to all policies pertaining to salary, OT, sick/vacation days, etc. Advice to Management: Properly train your FLMs on how to manage the work as well as the employees. Make Blue training mandatory and more in-depth with refresher courses
    • “Sales executive”

      Current Employee — Anonymous Employee. Pros: Flexible working schedule, goal oriented with many opportunities for further formal and informal education. can easily change jobs in the company. Cons: Some employee frustration due to focus on cost cutting, reducing perks and salary increase. Expense controls at times seem to be highest priority probably as legacy of 2015 roadmap Advice to Management: Concentrate on employee morale and compelling employee value proposition to attract and retain talent.
    • “No longer the same ideals or values”

      Current Employee — Market Segment Manager. I have been working at IBM full-time (more than 10 years). Pros: Innovative people and excellent ability to scale up successful endeavors to global proportions. Reasonable pay, and good benefits. Cons: Executive leadership has lost its way. The folks selected to serve at the most senior levels behave like tyrants, are not likable and in some cases aren't trustworthy. That means the people they lead don't give their all and the company is suffering as a result. It's a big difference from where the company was 10 years ago. Advice to Management: Replace the bullies in the top ranks and put back the true leaders.
    • “Great Resume Builder”

      Former Employee — Senior Consultant in New York, NY. Pros: You get the opportunity to work with some great people in various organizations. The travel has its perks (you can keep all of your accumulated points for personal use). There is opportunity to learn various facets of a project from beginning to end. Cons: The training to prepare consultants for client-facing roles is non-existent and you can be "placed" into an area of limited knowledge just to make the numbers for a project. Very political!
    • “People? What people?”

      Former Employee — Anonymous Employee. Pros: Huge company, you don't need anything but your personal card to get doors open. Great product offerings. Cons: Managers do not have the professional level to do their job well. They treat employees as meat, exerting undue pressure only in terms of its objectives. The bureaucracy is overwhelming. Probably the worst technology company in Argentina. Advice to Management: Go to the University!
    • “Great place to work, Lots of opportunity and technology”

      Current Employee — Advisory Software Engineer in Austin, TX. I have been working at IBM full-time (more than 10 years). Pros: IBM is very large and it allows you the opportunity to move within the company and work on many different technologies. Lots of smart and dedicated people. Work-life balance is fantastic despite crunch time hours at time (part of the software business). Cons: Managers are cookie cutter and not qualified for certain positions. Management refuses to update their skills to keep up with modern practices (agile development, design driven software). Salary and bonus is not at all competitive and raises are non-existent. Advice to Management: Get up to date on modern development practices. Listen more, interject less.
    • “Get ready for the next RA”

      Former Employee — Anonymous Employee. Pros: Worked here for 15 years, saw the morale of the employees go down hill every year. When your job is always on the line, it is hard to enjoy it. Saw many good workers get RA'd year after year. After years of layoffs, they are getting rid of the best ones, and, wonder how much longer this company will be around. Upper management doesn't have a clue. Cons: Treat your U.S. based employees better. Advice to Management: It's too late.
    • “Good Engineers, Bad Upper Management”

      Former Employee — Staff Software Engineer (Band 7 Software Developer) in Tucson, AZ. I worked at IBM full-time (more than 5 years).

      Pros: The culture amongst IBM's engineers is one of collaboration and cooperation. I really liked that primary communication was done through chat, not email, and that engineers were generally immediately helpful in getting others unblocked. Combine that with the fact that the engineering core is highly competent, very driven, and run a broad range of experience levels, and you have a very efficient and effective work environment.

      Cons: IBM's executives have been gutting the company to keep an earnings-per-share promise from a decade ago. US workers continue to be laid off in big chunks, replaced with cheaper labor in China and India. Furloughs have also become commonplace, meaning that their otherwise middle-of-the-road compensation is actually below market averages. Their intent to unburden themselves of their hardware holdings is quite clear despite their clumsy attempts at veiling that "secret", which means that the remaining loyal workers are facing an uncertain future.

      Advice to Management: Get out while the getting's good. Earnings-per-share can only be propped up for so long by having the company eat itself. Eventually the remaining senior engineers will pack it in and take their institutional knowledge with them; the cheaper labor force will not be able to cope much less maintain high production standards, programs will falter, schedules will slip, and earnings-per-share will take a dive. The share price will drop like a rock when investors recognize the free lunch is over, and in a panic the executives will start dumping entire programs overboard starting as it always does with middle-management.

    • “IBM, the company that has lost sight of how important your employees are to the company's success.”

      Former Employee — Anonymous Employee in Seattle, WA. Pros: You get to interact and work with great people. Cons: Too many layoffs; you never know when your manager will tell you that its time for another layoff so IBM can make its numbers.
    • “IBM”

      Former Employee — Sales Support in Brooklyn, NY. I worked at IBM full-time (more than a year.) Pros: Telecommuting allowed for good work-life balance. Autonomy to do job. Good pay. Cons: Unstable job security. High medical premium for families. Advice to Management: Value contributions of operations and administrative personnel.
    • “In Decline”

      Former Employee — Experienced Professional. I worked at IBM full-time (more than 10 years.) Pros: Mature organisation, with strong and well developed processes. Cons: The company is 'downsizing' and divesting many areas of the business. They're performing quarterly retrenchments and expecting the remaining resources to pick up the slack...without investing in tools and automation. The culture has become somewhat toxic. Advice to Management: Share your hidden commercial agenda with your employees.
    • “Not good”

      Current Employee — Anonymous Employee. Pros: Good-work life balance. Work from home facilities. Cons: Not very good at appraisals. Management is very bad. Everyone works like in a government organization. No innovation. Same old 30-years old IBM software. Advice to Management: Leave the job.
    • “Okay.”

      Current Employee — Information Developer in Boston, MA. I have been working at IBM full-time (more than 3 years). Pros: Flexible schedules, generally. You do get to work with lots of people. Cons: Management is obsessed with justifying itself and its processes. This can be a bother, as you spend a lot of time doing things that don't make your stuff better for customers. Stingy with raises. Advice to Management: Handle things with a lighter touch.
  • Alliance for Retired Americans Friday Alert. This week's topics include:
    • Supreme Court Decision on Same-Sex Marriage Benefits Older Seniors
    • White House Conference on Aging Webcast
    • Connecticut Alliance Holds its Convention
    • Medicare Turns 50: Join us in Celebration
    • National Legislative Conference Next Week – Sen. Stabenow Now Confirmed
New on the Alliance@IBM Site

Job Cut Reports

  • Comment 07/01/15:

    Get your message out in different locations. I encourage you to make comments in IBM Twitter feeds such as @IBMWatson and @IBM_NEWS. Also, consider commenting on any IBM Facebook page. IBM encourages the use of social media so let us take advantage of social media to get our message out. -Anon-
  • Comment 07/01/15:

    In regards to the article about IBM offering contractor positions to employees who were RAed from Columbia, MO:
    "It became a bit of a chuckle because it was so ironic," they said. "When I first joined IBM, they didn't say, 'Oh, you're only going to be there for one year, two years or three years.' So when they say, 'Yeah it's a one year contract,' that has about as much grain of truth in it as when you first got hired. They cut you when they need to cut you."

    Absolutely true! And as a contractor you are just an IBM Purchase Order (PO). Yes, that's all. And IBM can terminate a PO whenever they want to not pay for it anymore. -Anonymous-

If you hire good people and treat them well, they will try to do a good job. They will stimulate one another by their vigor and example. They will set a fast pace for themselves. Then if they are well led and occasionally inspired, if they understand what the company is trying to do and know they will share in its sucess, they will contribute in a major way. The customer will get the superior service he is looking for. The result is profit to customers, employees, and to stcckholders. —Thomas J. Watson, Jr., from A Business and Its Beliefs: The Ideas That Helped Build IBM.

This site is designed to allow IBM Employees to communicate and share methods of protecting their rights through the establishment of an IBM Employees Labor Union. Section 8(a)(1) of the National Labor Relations Act states it is a violation for Employers to spy on union gatherings, or pretend to spy. For the purpose of the National Labor Relations Act, notice is given that this site and all of its content, messages, communications, or other content is considered to be a union gathering.